Aug 15, 2016

Welcome to IES24
The Lighting Conference

New York City, August 15-17, New York Marriott Marquis, Times Square

August 3 – 5, 2023     Renaissance Schaumburg Hotel & Convention Center

Take the Stage with Your Knowledge!
Submissions are Now Open

IES’ annual conference, IES24: The Lighting Conference, is the preeminent conference for all things lighting, from research to design to technology and more – a true state of the industry event.
Join us in New York City, 15 – 17 August, 2024, as a speaker for conference sessions, pre-conference workshops, or technical papers & presentations.

We are excited to announce that we are now accepting speaker and workshop submissions for IES24! We are on the lookout for dynamic and enthusiastic presenters who can deliver powerful and compelling sessions.
Proposals are currently being accepted for the following conference activities:
• Conference Sessions – 60 min
• Pre-Conference Workshops = 3 – 6 hours

Submissions for technical papers, technical presentations and posters will be opened in March 2024.

Deadline for submissions is January 10,2024 

1:00 PM – 5:00 PM

Workshop: Computational Parametric Workflows

Presenters: Reinhardt Swart, Nathan Sharnas, Rick Mistrick
4 CEU credits

Built projects and design processes are becoming more complex and data-driven, leaving designers to respond to a growing list of demands. Advancements in software enable parametric workflows that allow designers to model complex design spaces and advance sustainable strategies. This workshop will explore these workflows, using Rhino 3D modeling software and the Grasshopper plug-in to simulate and analyze daylighting performance, design environmentally responsible projects, and effectively inform our processes.

Note: Pre-conference workshops are an add-on to your conference registration

1:00 PM – 5:00 PM

Workshop: Modeling an Approach to the Design of Lighting Control Systems

Presenters: Ruth Taylor, Daniel Blitzer, Jessica Collier
4 CEU credits

Too often the design of lighting controls begins with a favored proprietary system. This tends to limit choices, especially for those without deep controls experience. But it doesn’t have to be this way.

In this workshop, participants will model an interactive decision framework, an alternative independent of specific manufacturer systems. Participants will explore how controls objectives suggest appropriate system capabilities, how technology variables shape cost and risk parameters, and how system architectures support or limit the desired outcomes. Working with hypothetical spaces, participants will also create a Controls Design Intent based on the decisions made though the framework.

Pre-requisite: Basic familiarity with lighting controls

Note: Pre-conference workshops are an add-on to your conference registration

1:00 PM – 5:00 PM

Workshop:Understanding Light and Color by Seeing and Doing

Presenter: Robert Davis
4 CEU credits

“I hear and I forget, I see and I remember, I do and I understand.” If you work in lighting, you have most likely heard of the IES TM-30 color rendering metrics and have gained some familiarity with color rendering concepts such as fidelity, gamut, hue shifts, and saturation changes, along with some of the technical details of color vector graphics and hue bins. But for most of us, this familiarity has mostly come from hearing webinars and presentations with lots of graphs and numbers that explain the new TM-30 metrics and compare them to the traditional CRI. This workshop is designed to deepen your understanding through a series of hands-on, eyes-on small group exercises. These guided exercises will strengthen your ability to apply color rendering metrics to lighting design problems by grounding them in your own personal visual experiences and through hands-on use of the TM-30 tools and reports. By seeing and doing, you will be better equipped to remember and understand!

Note: Pre-conference workshops are an add-on to your conference registration.

7:00 AM – 8:00 AM

EP/Leadership Forum Breakfast

 

8:00 AM – 11:40 PM

Emerging Professionals Day

AGENDA

  • 8-8:15:  Meet the President
    • President: Billy Tub
  • 8:15-8:30: Tribute to Howard Brandston
    • History of his career, devotion to education, and EPs in particular
    • Speaker: Dan Salinas
  • 8:30-9:45: Local Rep/Distributor/Manufacturer Panel
    • Agent: Julie Blankenheim, Principal, Chicago Lightworks
    • Manufacturer: Brian Maite, National Director, Leviton Lighting
    • Distributor: Rick Kerman, Chairman/Owner, Steiner Electric
    • Contractor: Tim Kellenberger, CEO/Owner, Kellenberger Electric
    • Moderator: Mark Roush
  • 9:45-10:00: Mid-morning break
  • 10:00-11:40: Speed Networking Seasoned Industry Professionals
    • 10 minutes per professional
  • 11:40-12:00: Gather for Busses/Travel to Acuity
  • 12-4 pm: Acuity Training Event (Includes Lunch)
    • Title: Bright Minds, Responsible Lighting: An Immersive Experience with Acuity Brands (Please see below)

11:40 AM – 4:00 PM

Emerging Professionals Day

Field Trip

In this three-hour event, you will tour Acuity Brands Des Plaines lighting manufacturing and distribution facility to learn how lighting fixtures are brought to market, including industry standard photometric testing,  manufacturing and distribution.  Vignettes and instructor-led demonstrations will reinforce use cases for a variety of lighting techniques, luminaire types and common terminology focusing on sustainable design practices.

 

  • Identify various luminaire types and their place in interior and exterior building applications.
  • Define and discuss common terminology as it relates to luminaires and their use.
  • Recall the path to market of luminaires and other lighting equipment from concept to end-of-life disposal.
  • Recognize the key elements of sustainability & their impacts including Embodied & Operational Carbon, Materials Responsibility & Workplace Social Responsibility as they pertain to creating, manufacturing, specifying, delivering and installing luminaires.

 

Credit AIA 3 LU | HSW Credits / FBPEILT 3 PDH Credits

8:00 AM – 3:00 PM

Leadership Forum

The IES Leadership Forum is the year’s most vital event for Section Leaders. This day-long program will give you the tools and information necessary to successfully lead your section and ensure that your section thrives! This year’s Leadership Forum will include roundtable discussions, membership growth best practices, and a DEIR Q&A, among other valuable lessons. If you are involved in Section Leadership at any level, please make sure to select Leadership Forum when registering for the Annual Conference.

11:00 AM – 3:00 PM

Past Presidents Lunch

5:00 PM – 6:00 PM

Illumination Awards Reception

6:00 PM – 8:00 PM

2023 Illumination Awards Gala

Celebrate the best in lighting and the 50th anniversary of the IES Illumination Awards!

8:00 PM – 10:00 PM

Illumination Awards After Party

With thanks to Title Sponsor; Acuity Brands

7:00 AM – 8:00 AM

Breakfast

8:00 AM – 8:30 AM

Morning General Session

8:30 AM – 9:30 AM

Speaker: Mark Lien, IES Industry Relations

1 CEU

9:30 AM – 6:30 PM

Tabletop Exhibits Open 

10:00 AM – 11:00 AM

Plenary Session

Speakers: Dane Sanders, Nick Mesler

1 CEU

Clanton and Associates worked with Salt Lake City from 2018 to 2020 to develop the Salt Lake City Lighting Master Plan, a significant shift in how Salt Lake City utilizes streetlights while balancing multiple values, including safety, character, equity and responsibility to public health and the environment. This came from the understanding that artificial light at night has impacts on each of these values, and a commitment to do better.

This presentation will discuss how the public engagement process and GIS data sources were utilized to develop the guideposts and comprehensive strategies of the Salt Lake City Street Lighting Master Plan. As this Street Lighting Master Plan is implemented over time, the street and pedestrian lighting will transition to utilizing dark sky strategies by reducing upward light, applying warmer color temperatures based on adjacent land uses, adaptive dimming strategies, and controlling light trespass.

11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Plenary Session

Speakers: Shirley Coyle

1 CEU

As awareness increases in multiple areas, the lighting community is thinking differently about outdoor lighting practice. Learn how changes in thinking may translate into practical changes in our outdoor lighting standards – as we incorporate learnings on Light & Human Health, Ecological Impact on Flora & Fauna, Light & Justice, and Dark Sky.

12:00 PM – 1:15 PM

Lunch & Tabletop Exhibits

1:15 PM – 2:15 PM

Breakout Sessions

Speaker: Karen Murphy

1 CEU

This session requires active participation. This session will review how to develop a business plan for lighting services. Will step through a progression of questions that will help attendees review and update their business plans. Business plan items that apply to independent lighting businesses as well as lighting departments within larger organizations will be discussed. We will explore goals and how to achieve them through well-crafted business plans. We will learn from each other and identify how to create and modify plans to form sustainable businesses.

Speaker: Ken Walczak

1 CEU

The Overview Effect has been described as a cognitive shift experienced by astronauts viewing the Earth from space. It can inspire “an overwhelming and increased sense of connection to other people and the Earth as a whole”. What could we learn if we had an Overview Effect for outdoor light at night?

Using an innovative imaging system flown on stratospheric high-altitude balloons – researchers, students and volunteers at the Adler Planetarium have mapped our world at night to reveal a new perspective on how we use outdoor lighting. We will show results from data collected over Indianapolis and how these nighttime maps can help inform responsible outdoor lighting practices. Our data reveals the primary sources of excessive upward light at night, the disparities in light emission and reveals strategies to best mitigate light pollution and lighting design for a better future for people and the Earth as a whole.

Papers/Technical Presentations

Presenter: Nina Sharp

In this study, we investigated the effect of a dynamic lighting intervention on sleep quality, depression, and agitation in older adults with dementia living in long-term care facilities. The study was conducted as a within-subject study design over 7 days of conventional lighting (Baseline) followed by 21 days of room lighting (Placebo) and then 21 days of dynamic lighting (Treatment). Findings suggested that lighting in memory care facilities plays a crucial role in enhancing the quality of life and sleep for older adults with dementia.

Presenter: Nina Sharp

In this study, we investigated the effects of applying a biodynamic lighting intervention in home offices on sleep quality, cognitive performance, and alertness in remote workers. Participants were involved in a five-week experiment. Each participant underwent a home screening visit and then had a one-week period of conventional lighting exposure to establish a baseline. Following this, they received two weeks of either biodynamic lighting or placebo lighting during the workday. In both interventions, participants received a similar dosage of circadian lighting throughout the working hours which was in accordance with the WELL Standard V2 guidelines for circadian lighting (275lux); however, the “time factor” was disregarded in the placebo condition. The results of this study offer compelling evidence that lighting is a crucial aspect of home-based work environments that has a significant impact on remote workers’ cognitive performance which has a direct bearing on the health and productivity of employees.

Presenter: Naomi Miller

The phantom array effect visibility has been investigated for 10 years or more, but no dataset has been complete enough for developing a visibility measure until now. Following the psychophysical procedure of other TLM metrics such as Mp and SVM, this paper presents its development and possible target values.

Presenter: Naomi Miller

Light sources located ≥60° vertically above the line of sight have conventionally been excluded from glare calculations. But then why do we wear baseball caps in bright overhead sunshine? The PNNL laboratory has conducted a human factors experiment to explore the response to glare sources at different positions to explore this issue, as well as looking at how two different SPDs affect the glare response. This talk will address some of the preliminary results.

2:15 PM – 3:15 PM

Breakout Sessions

Speakers: Shoshanna Segal, Carol C. Jones

1 CEU

With so many different types of systems and requirements, how do you get what you really want from lighting controls? Designers and architects need to consider the visual environment they are creating as well as the operational characteristics of the systems being installed. Design teams now often find themselves faced with questions of how to create a level of interoperability and digital integration with adjacent building systems that was not so commonplace in the recent past. Fortunately, the tools exist to articulate both the designer’s intent and the specific steps required to achieve that intent. By examining the development process behind the Control Intent Narrative and the Sequence of Operations, this seminar will provide guidance for assembling these documents and specific examples of language that is both clear and contractually enforceable.

Presenter: Nick Mesler

1 CEU

This presentation will cover regional street lighting design at scale and the considerations required beyond the standards. Through real project examples, attendees will gain insights into how regional illumination photometrics can identify existing lighting shortfalls, leading to improved decision-making and recommendations. The session will cover the integration of streetlighting considerations into comprehensive planning, addressing competing needs, promoting equity, and fostering collaboration with stakeholders.

Papers/Technical Presentations

Presenter: Jason Tuenge

This technical presentation will share findings from the first round of germicidal ultraviolet (GUV) product testing through the US Department of Energy’s CALiPER program. Electrical, radiometric, and photobiological safety testing was performed for three types of LED and low-pressure mercury (LPM) products: portable towers, whole-room luminaires for vacant spaces, and whole-room luminaires for occupied spaces.

Presenter: Rugved Kore

This session will give you insights on evaluation of the suitability of a mini-spectrometer and a RGB sensor as a wearable device. Various lighting conditions were measured using these two devices, and the data were compared with a calibrated spectroradiometer to analyze their accuracy.

Presenter: Jesús Obando

Light can be used as a means to create atmospheres in spaces that can influence mood, emotion, behavior, spatial impression and preference. In addition, it can impact the human biological clock by regulating multiple body functions such as sleep patterns, cognitive performance, mood, well-being, and hormone release and production. From this complex situation described above, about the effects of light on people, the interest of the present research work arises. The objective of this research is to determine the preferences of users of different age groups in relation to the various technological alternatives in indoor residential lighting.

Presenter: Mahya Fani

The study aims to investigate the extent to which interior features, including seating layouts and wall color and reflection, can affect the non-visual effects of daylight to increase daylight-driven circadian stimulus within a design-studio learning environment. The results suggest that the circadian potential of the space is positively correlated with the melanopic reflectance of the wall materials and the collaborative desk arrangement. These findings provide valuable insights for designers who wish to enhance daylight-driven circadian stimulus in flexible and collaborative learning environments, such as design-studio classrooms, while preserving the space’s geometrical characteristics.

3:30 PM – 4:30 PM

Breakout Sessions

Speaker: Robert Soler

1 CEU

The lighting industry has become more comfortable with the idea that light can impact our physiology beyond vision. The industry has battled internally over which metric to use, what criteria to meet and how long to meet said criteria. As we’re finally starting to find conclusion to these debates, one point of clarity remains. Circadian lighting and wellness lighting are not the same thing, nor should they be applied in the same way.

Through a combination of peer reviewed literature and translational overview, this talk will cover what circadian lighting is and what outcomes we can expect from circadian lighting. This talk will also cover what wellness lighting is and what we can expect from wellness lighting. It will cover how we should be thinking about applying each one in a variety of different settings including home, office, healthcare facilities and more.

Speakers: Brittany Lynch, Lisa Reed

1 CEU

Before the pandemic, retaining women talent in the lighting industry was strained. Women enter the workforce in the same capacity as their male counterparts. Yet if you look at company leadership, women are under-represented. At IALD in 2018, the question was posed: Why do women leave lighting design? The presentation revealed that mothers left lighting design due to their high demanding career colliding with their seemingly insurmountable parenting responsibilities.

Fast forward to September 2020, the whole country took note when over 850,000 women dropped out of the workforce. It became clear in the midst of the pandemic that schools were moving to online learning. In a moment of intense pressure, mothers stepped away from their salaries, careers, stability to teach America’s future generations. While mothers and caretakers have returned to the workforce, it still does not match pre-pandemic levels.

It’s time to take a step back and evaluate how companies are supporting our nation’s caregivers to retain valuable design talent. Four years later, we will follow up with the question: How do you retain working parents?

Papers/Technical Presentations

Presenter: Paolo Creati

Presentation description coming soon

Presenters: Lydia Simpson

Building on the 2016 study “Migraine photophobia originating in cone-driven retinal pathways.” and the 2000 study “The wavelength of light causing photophobia in migraine and tension-type headache between attacks.”, Shining a Light on Migraines looks at how different spectral distributions of green light affected the discomfort threshold of participants with and without migraines. The selected colors were based on the idea that green light is the least bothersome color of light for migraine-related photophobia while blue and red wavelengths of light are the most bothersome. While prior studies looked at narrow spectral distributions of primary colors, this study explores the spectrum between blue and red to see at what point green switches from therapeutic to bothersome.

Presenter: Michael Myer

In 2012, Williams et al, published a meta-analysis of lighting controls in commercial buildings. The underlying research that formed the meta-analysis primarily involved conventional lighting sources (non-light-emitting diode [LED]). The meta-analysis found “24% for occupancy sensors; 28% for daylighting; 31% for personal tuning; 36% for institutional tuning; and 38% for multiple approaches. ” Beyond the meta-analysis not including LED-based research, this research primarily involved zone-based lighting controls and not networked / luminaire level lighting controls (LLLC). Neither LEDs nor networked controls were prevalent prior to 2012.
In contrast, DesignLights Consortium (DLC) published in 2017 a study focused on savings from networked lighting controls (NLC) . This analysis involved 114 projects that included LEDs and NLC (some not all, LLLC systems). This DLC analysis found an average savings of 47% for NLC. DLC included a comparison of average savings from the NLC analysis with other studies. DLC specifically cited the 38% from Williams et al 2012 and the 47% value DLC found.
Neither of those analyses reported disaggregated savings withing the space for the different control schemes. This paper presents disaggregated energy savings across the space. This paper will provide an estimate of daylight savings from different distances from the vertical fenestration. This paper will demonstrate occupancy sensor savings based on sensor size.

Presenter: David Bratt, John Grepe

The need for connected emergency lighting stems primarily from the time, labor, and cost savings of completely automating the testing and reporting process to ensure the emergency lighting system remains fully operational and ready to perform when it is needed. The time and cost required to perform the testing and reporting becomes exorbitant even for moderately sized facilities. Using the technology now available to connect the emergency lighting system so the testing can be completed automatically at a time when it is convenient for a particular facility, can dramatically reduce the time and money needed to keep the system in tip-top condition. This presentation is designed to explain this in more detail and describe the various methods to achieve a connected emergency lighting system so the attendee can make a more informed decision on how to apply what is currently available today. One possible method will be explored in more depth. Again, the end result is to ensure the safety of occupants in a facility by having a fully operational emergency lighting system in place AND to save the time and money involved in keeping it that way.

4:30 PM – 6:00 PM

Progress Report 

The mission of the Progress Report is to keep in touch with developments in the art and science of lighting throughout the world and prepare a yearly report of achievements for the Society. Acceptance is based on an impartial judging process used by the committee to evaluate each submission on its uniqueness, innovation and significance to the lighting industry.

6:00 PM – 7:00 PM

Tabletop exhibit reception

7:00 PM – 9:30 PM

Friday Night Lights Platinum Sponsored Event

Sponsored by Cooper Lighting Solutions

7:00 AM – 8:00 AM

Breakfast

7:00 AM – 8:00 AM

Fellows Breakfast

7:00 AM – 1:30 PM

Tabletop Exhibits Open

8:00 AM – 9:00 AM

Morning General Session

9:00 AM – 10:00 AM

Plenary Session

Speaker: Kimberly Mercier

1 CEU

As creators of electric light, we elect to ignore our historic condition of living in nature’s light and, in so doing, we impact our health and wellbeing. If it were true, however, that we were impacting our physiological wellbeing, it would be obvious and there would be standards, and recommendations, and best practices…right?

In this presentation, the speaker will explore the evolving nature of lighting research related to light and health. She will share thought leader opinions about the race to create standards, the market conditions that are driving the light and human health environment, design considerations and challenges given the recommendations available, and suggestions for incorporating human health considerations in the lighting projects you are currently designing and building.

New discoveries in light and human health will change how the design community thinks about lighting design, implementation, control, lighting product manufacturing and availability, and our decisions about the lighting energy we spend. Let’s affect change with light!

controlling light trespass.

10:15 AM – 11:15 AM

Plenary Session

Speakers: Naomi Miller, Lia Irvin

1 CEU

Temporal Light Modulation (TLM) is an increasing phenomenon in indoor, outdoor, and vehicular applications, due to the widespread adoption of LED sources. Less than half of LED lighting systems produce problematic TLM, but it is common in small-profile linear luminaires, decorative fixtures, residential luminaires, screw base LED retrofit lamps, holiday light strings, vehicular tail lights, daytime running lights, dashboard displays, and even headlights. Unfortunately, there has been a delayed recognition that certain TLM waveform characteristics and viewing conditions can result in distraction and disorientation, cognitive effects, and serious health consequences in some populations. The neurological impacts may occur with or without conscious visibility of the TLM.

Research into responses to TLM is underway, but guidance is needed now, since anecdotal evidence suggests a link to migraines, nausea and disorientation, and even more serious health consequences. Until there is more evidence, we need provisional guidelines to raise awareness among dimmer, driver, and luminaire manufacturers.

11:15 AM – 12:15 PM

Plenary Session

Speaker: Ruth Taylor

1 CEU

The problem with lighting controls is people. You can run an entire conference about what people don’t know: how to use controls, how to repair controls that don’t work, how to configure networked systems, how to describe the systems they want or produce, and more. But what is being done?

Education, at least that is the typical answer. If we want to change the “how to”, the behaviors of market participants, maybe it’s time for some new tools to enhance the training of key under-represented sectors of the market.

This presentation outlines how the Department of Energy is developing new training priorities and methods in order to improve the effectiveness of lighting controls. For the last five years, DOE’s Next Generation Lighting Systems project has used observational research to characterize the problems at the various points where people interact with lighting controls. Ruth Taylor will describe the several research-based techniques that her team is developing with the goal of changing behaviors in the market.

12:15 PM – 1:30 PM

Lunch & Tabletop Exhibits

1:30 PM – 2:30 PM

Breakout Sessions

Speaker: Lyn Gomes, Michael Poplawski

1 CEU

A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away, DG-29, the standard for commissioning of lighting, was created. Time has passed, the industry has matured, and technology has advanced to the point that this standard required a major update both in content and name. When released later this year, it will become ANSI/IES LP-8, the Standard for Commissioning for Lighting and Lighting Control Systems. This document is a resource not only for commissioning providers, but also for the commissioning team (e.g., owners, architects, designers, engineers, contractors, distributors).

Master Yoda didn’t become a Jedi overnight – it was a process of mind and body training. Similarly, Commissioning is a systematic process (a series of discreet activities) that seeks to enhance delivery of a project. It focuses on verifying and documenting that all the commissioned systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the Owner’s Project Requirements (OPR). Commissioning starts in the predesign phase, continues into occupancy, and throughout the building’s lifetime. COMMISSIONING IS NOT STARTUP.

The update will improve on the original and serve as a practical, boots-on-the-ground resource for commissioning of lighting and lighting control systems that can be read and utilized in standalone sections. It will cover commissioning for large and small projects. Improvements include best practices, updates to outdated information, and align with ASHRAE Guideline 0 and the Building Commissioning Association’s Best Practices. (Commissioning providers will recognize these documents as the equivalent of the Jedi Path for Jedi Initiates.) It defines responsibilities for key members of the commissioning team and describes scope and sets minimum performance criteria for commissioning providers. Entirely new sections were created, including commissioning for existing buildings (aka retrocommissioning). Sample resources were added, including functional tests, design review checklists, and OPR and BOD examples and questionnaires.

As technology advances, so must the practice of commissioning. Our committee recognized this need and created content to explore future of the commissioning process. This presentation will be given by committee members (including a Jedi Commissioning Master) and serve as a pre-release preview of the standard. Come to this presentation to glean insights into best practices and weigh in on the future for true commissioning.

Speaker: Paige Donnell

1 CEU

While the concept of employee wellness has always been an important discussion topic, physical and nutritional health are more often prioritized while social, intellectual, and emotional health are not as actively analyzed and addressed. A key tool for addressing these often-overlooked wellness factors is mentorship: a holistic investment in our internal teaming, fulfillment, collaboration, productivity, project success, leadership development, and collective office-wide wellbeing. Throughout this talk, we will reveal a working model of mentorship and emphasize the role it plays in recruitment, staff engagement, leadership development, and retainment along with easy-to-integrate actions to enhance alignment, team dynamics, and goals.

Papers/Technical Presentations

Presenter: Mary Guzowski

This paper explores daylighting relationships between six bio-inspired design frameworks for nature-based strategies in architecture, including: biophilic, bioregional, bioclimatic, biomimetic, biomorphic, and biomaterial perspectives. How are these frameworks related, distinct, and/or integrated? The six bio-inspired frameworks discussed in this paper provide related but varied perspectives on nature and biology-inspired daylighting design. Integrating daylighting with one or more of these bio-inspired approaches is a strategic method to promote passive and low-energy strategies toward net-positive energy and sustainable design goals while simultaneously leveraging health benefits for humans, other species, and the planet.

Presenter: Abdulrahman Aljuhani, Richard Mistrick

Daylight Glare Probability (DGP) is impacted by both the vertical illuminance at an observer and characteristics of the glare source. This paper illustrates how different shade properties, as well as a view of the sun through the shades, impacts the predicted level of DGP.

Presenter: Tony Esposito

Using a simulation based on a real, five-channel tunable LED lighting system, we show that Correlated Color Temperature (CCT) is not a reasonable predictor of the biological potency of light, whether characterized with CIE melanopic Equivalent Daylight Illuminance (mel-EDI), Equivalent Melanopic Lux (EML) (a scalar multiple of mel-EDI), or Circadian Stimulus (CS). At a photopic corneal illuminance of 300 lx and Rf ≥ 70, spectra can vary in CS from 17 to 41% across CCTs from 2500 to 6000 K, and up to 23% at a single CCT, due to the choice of spectrum alone. The CS range is largest, and notably discontinuous, at a CCT of 3500 K, the location of the inflection point of the CS model. At a photopic corneal illuminance of 300 lx and Rf ≥ 70, mel-EDI can vary from 123 to 354 lx across CCTs from 2500 to 6000 K and can vary by up to 123 lx at a fixed CCT (e.g., 196 to 319 lx at 5000 K). The range of achievable mel-EDI increases as CCT increases and, on average, decreases as color fidelity, characterized with IES TM-30 Rf, increases. These data demonstrate that there is no easy mathematical conversion between CS and mel-EDI when a spectrally diverse spectra set of spectral power distributions is considered.

Presenters: Nayoun Ryu, Craig Bernecker

In a twenty block walk from 14th street to 34th street in New York, there are twenty sidewalk sheds covering a portion of each block. That means pedestrians spend almost half of their journey under a sidewalk shed. The common perception of a sidewalk shed is that it is a temporary construction, but in practice, many sidewalk sheds have been in place for over a year, with lighting conditions under the sheds an important consideration for pedestrians on a daily basis. Sidewalk sheds are a common sight in New York City, providing protection for pedestrians and property during construction. With over 9,000 active sheds and more than 2 million total linear feet, they have become a signature feature of the city’s urban landscape, particularly in Manhattan. However, while sidewalk sheds serve an important physical safety function, they also come with certain challenges, such as issues with lighting that can also impact safety.

2:30 PM – 3:30 PM

Breakout Sessions

Speakers: Chris Sorensen

1 CEU

What is the definition of a sustainable luminaire? A broad view of the environmental impact of lighting encompasses so much more than energy consumed. A deeper look at how luminaires are designed, manufactured, and used exposes a plethora of opportunities to reduce their impact. The future of product development in the lighting industry will be driven by sustainability.

Speakers: Harold Jepsen, Nancy Clanton, Matt Hartley, Jim Gaines

1 CEU

This panel discussion takes a proactive look at responsibly addressing lighting glare with the UGR metric. Using an application-based approach, we’ll cover key UGR principles, as well as its pitfalls, to effectively design for human health, wellness and comfort.

Papers/Technical Presentations

Presenter: Wangyang Song

Photometric measures based on CIE 2-degree standard observer have been utilized to predict scene brightness with mixed results. This study presents a method to evaluate corneal illuminance as an indicator to predict scene brightness.

Presenter: Yuwei Wang

Color contrast influences visual attention, recognition, comprehension, and aesthetic preference. This presentation will report findings of a study investigating the effect of color contrast on the visual clarity of complex visual environments.

Presenters: Maria Nilsson Tengelin, Stefan Källberg

In this presentation we show a method to investigate insect response to different luminance levels to find a threshold level for positive phototaxis. The set-up comprises a box with wide-angle cameras, near infrared LEDs and a luminance source with variable output. The activity level and pattern of movement at different light levels are demonstrated for Greater Wax Moth (Galleria Mellonella).

Presenters: Maria Nilsson Tengelin, Stefan Källberg

In this presentation, we will show a method with a sensitive light meter on a drone to measure light that is scattered up into the night sky. Measurements at different heights combined with images from the drone’s camera quickly provide a good overview of large areas and light sources contributing to light pollution. Specifically, we have investigated how light from a road lighting system is spread for different color temperatures and optics depending on the environment.

3:45 PM – 4:45 PM

Breakout Sessions

Speaker: Fanny Soulard

1 CEU

This presentation is an invitation to overcome and question our unconscious biases by investigating how we can play better with each one’s differences while designing a lighting project in a culturally diverse context.

The assessment of three study cases located in Vietnam will help to understand the cultural impact on a project elaboration and reveal how ICI – Inter-Cultural Intelligence- tools can generate significant benefits for individuals, teams, companies, and communities.

A role-playing game will close this session by inviting volunteers to express their opinion toward a given situation involving interculturality.

Speakers: Alp Durmus, Annika Jagerbrand, Maria Nilsson Tengelin

1 CEU

Light at night (LAN) enables us to enjoy outdoors at night, cultivates economic growth, and increases the perception of safety. Unfortunately, LAN has been connected to adverse health outcomes, such as circadian disruption, mood effects, and increased breast cancer incidence risk in humans. While the negative impacts of LAN at night, often referred to as light pollution, has gained popularity, the studies that lead to this body of knowledge were seldom under scrutiny. This talk will focus on not just what we know about light pollution and its circadian impacts on humans, but also how do we know what we know, specifically critically analyzing the methods and limitations of the light pollution studies.

Responsibly illuminating outdoor environments at night requires a better understanding of the impacts and the reasons for the documented impacts. Studies investigating health outcomes of LAN utilize a variety of methods sometimes resulting in conflicting outcomes. We conducted a systematic review focusing on the experimental methods and health outcomes of LAN studies conducted in lab, in-situ, and longitudinal studies. While most studies found a negative impact of LAN on human health, lighting conditions were not adequately reported or controlled in many cases. We will discuss best practices for future work investigating LAN effects on human health outcomes and emphasize the need for a multidisciplinary approach to improve the scientific quality of research studies. We will also provide recommendations for outdoor lighting practice to reduce negative impacts on human health.

Papers/Technical Presentations

Presenter: Mahya Fani

This study aims to assess the extent to which geometrical and optical properties of partitions, including their material, height and layout, affect the circadian potential of an open-plan office space. Results indicate that, generally, the circadian potential of the office space rises with the increase of the melanopic reflectance of the partition material and the decrease of partition height. With partitions higher than the eye level, arranging them in a parallel position to the window would result in higher EML levels, whereas with the lower partition heights, the perpendicular arrangement of partitions to the window would be a more suitable choice regarding the circadian lighting conditions in most of the investigated cases.

Presenter: Sarah Safranek, Corey Strachan

Relatively new metrics for characterizing the impact of light on non-visual physiological responses in humans has necessitated the development of spectral simulation tools that estimate the quantity and spectrum of light in the built environment. These spectral simulation tools increase the number of bands used to represent the color of materials and light sources to calculate metrics like equivalent melanopic lux (EML), which has a different spectral sensitivity than illuminance. One such tool, ALFA, is a Radiance-based commercial software that allows for spectral simulations using 81 bands, ideal for representing the spectral power distribution (SPD) of LED light sources. This presentation will 1) provide an overview of the spectral simulation workflow, including the current availability of spectral data; and 2) discuss the results of a analysis aimed identifying potential sources of error that may result from reasonable assumptions made throughout the design process.

Presenter: Michael Myer

The Zonal Cavity Method (also known as “Lumen Method”) has primarily been used to determine the average illuminance for interior applications. There are few calculation methods for calculating the average illuminance for exterior applications. A calculation has existed for calculating roadway illuminance, but a method for calculating average illuminance for non-roadway calculations currently has not been published.

Presenter: Michael Myer

Richman et al published An Empirical Data Based Method for Development of Lighting Energy Standards first as part of the 1998 IES Annual and then later in 1999 in the Journal of the IES. Since this publication, this method has been the primary method for establishing energy code lighting power densities for ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1 until the 2019 version.

4:45 PM – 5:45 PM

Keynote Speaker: Eric Corey Freed, RA, LFA, LEED Fellow, EcoDistricts AP
Principal, Sustainability Director
CannonDesign

1 CEU

Imagine a building that can boost immune response, lower blood pressure, or speed collaboration efforts. By tapping into biology, we can trigger these specific outcomes through the Architecture. In this talk, we’ll explore how to design student and health facilities that boost your biological responses.

We’ll explore a new approach to achieving high performance educational facilities using a symbiotic mindset to design in ways that triggers your biology to improve your health and outcomes. We’ll explore the six categories of symbiosis: Systems, Senses, Signals, Cycles, Biomes, and Genomes, to uncover new approaches to boost student test scores, lower stress levels, or speed comprehension.

As we move from the Digital Age to the Biological Age, the line between the natural and the manmade will start to disappear. In this talk, we’ll explore how to embrace biology as the ultimate technology to develop a new approach to sustainable design that affect the people who live, work and play in our buildings.

Imagine if we designed our buildings to work WITH our biology? In this session, we’ll explore this new paradigm for sustainability that combines biophilia, with evidence-based design, with wellness to create a new approach to designing healthy buildings. We’ll explore how we can design a building that triggers specific physiological responses in students and staff using physiological systems, human senses, circadian rhythm, neurotransmitters, and microbiomes to transform how we provide care and learning. We’ll look at how to deploy next generation materials that are “build with biology” to introduce a radical approach to wellness.

Eric gets into “good trouble” a lot these days. That’s because he’s not afraid to speak up against traditional ways of designing and building. The built environment is one of the largest contributors of carbon dioxide emissions in the world. He’s fixated on changing that.

Eric believes in moving toward a future where regenerative and restorative buildings become the standard. Whether facilitating client workshops about carbon-smart design or rallying crowds of thousands around the need for a circular economy, his message is the same: we have the tools needed to slow and even reverse the impacts of climate change—but we must act now.

 

About Eric:
Eric Corey Freed is an award-winning architect, author, and global speaker. As Principal and Director of Sustainability for CannonDesign, he leads the healthcare, education, and commercial teams toward low-carbon, healthy, regenerative buildings for over 30 million square feet a year. For two decades, he was Founding Principal of organicARCHITECT, a visionary design leader in biophilic and regenerative design. 

His past roles include Vice President of the International Living Future Institute and Chief Community Officer of EcoDistricts, both nonprofits pushing innovative new paradigms for deep green buildings and communities. He serves on the board of Design Museum Everywhere, whose mission is to “bring the transformative power of design to all.”

Eric is the author of 12 books, including “Green Building & Remodeling for Dummies” and “Circular Economy for Dummies.” In 2012, he was named one of the 25 “Best Green Architecture Firms” in the US, and one of the “Top 10 Most Influential Green Architects.” In 2017, he was named one of Build’s American Architecture Top 25. He holds a prestigious LEED Fellow award from the US Green Building Council.

Book your Conference hotel room now!

The Lighting Conference at a Glance

Thursday

Emerging Professionals Day

Leadership Forum

Hand-On Workshops

Exhibits Reception

Society Awards

Opening Reception, sponsored by Cooper Lighting

Friday

Opening Keynote

General Sessions

Illumination Awards

Awards After Party, sponsored by Acuity

Saturday

Networking Session

Sessions & Papers

Industry Progress Report

IES25 Announcement

Emerging Professionals Day: Thursday
Industry Progress Report: Saturday
Previous slide
Next slide

Become an IES24 Partner

Partner Opportunities are Now Open

Want to reach over 500 lighting professionals?

Engage with industry leading professionals at this years IES ’24 Lighting Conference with one of our tailored packages. Choose from all encompassing packages that include online and in-person branding, exhibit table & marketing suites, through to single opportunities for an exhibit table.

Partner opportunities are now available for the Conference and the world renown Illumination Awards.

Click the image to view the full opportunities and contact us now through one of the button links to book.

Thank you to our 2023 Annual Conference Sponsors!

For information regarding the 2023 IES Annual Conference please contact Kevin Wolfe – [email protected].

Cooper Lighting Solutions
PLATINUM SPONSOR
Acuity Brands
GOLD SPONSOR
ALUZ
GOLD SPONSOR
Advance by Signifiy
Silver Sponsor
Silver Sponsor
Silver Sponsor
Silver Sponsor
Silver Sponsor
Landscape Forms
Silver Sponsor
Silver Sponsor
Silver Sponsor
Silver Sponsor
Silver Sponsor
Zumtobel logo
Silver Sponsor
Signify
Silver Sponsor
Cooper Lighting Solutions
Registration & Lanyard Sponsor
Current
Illumination Awards Reception Sponsor
Traxon e-Cue
Ice Breaker Sponsor
Landscape Forms
Saturday Keynote Sponsor
ETC Connect
Friday Keynote Sponsor

Interested in sponsoring or exhibiting at the IES 2023 Annual Conference? Contact Tiffany Teal at [email protected].

Thank you to our 2023 Emerging Professional Scholarship Sponsors!

Interested in supporting the IES Emerging Professionals Scholarship program? Contact Michael Austerlitz at [email protected].

You can directly donate to the Emerging Professionals fund here

Thank you to our 2023 Leadership Forum Sponsors!

Interested in supporting the IES Leadership Forum program? Contact Michael Austerlitz at [email protected].

Conference dates: Aug 3 – 5th 2023
Location: Renaissance Schaumburg Hotel & Convention Center
1551 Thoreau Dr N, Schaumburg, IL 60173

Theme

The theme for the 2023 IES Annual Conference is Light Responsibly.

This year’s theme focuses on the responsibility that the lighting industry has to itself, to the architectural and construction industry, and to the world at large to ensure that lighting has a net positive impact on the built environment.

The theme Light Responsibly is a call to action to the entire lighting community to use our knowledge, skills, and experience to affect positive change in the industry.

Proposals are currently being accepted for the following conference activities:

  • Posters (Deadline April 30)

1:00 PM – 5:00 PM

Workshop: Computational Parametric Workflows

Presenters: Reinhardt Swart, Nathan Sharnas, Rick Mistrick
4 CEU credits

Built projects and design processes are becoming more complex and data-driven, leaving designers to respond to a growing list of demands. Advancements in software enable parametric workflows that allow designers to model complex design spaces and advance sustainable strategies. This workshop will explore these workflows, using Rhino 3D modeling software and the Grasshopper plug-in to simulate and analyze daylighting performance, design environmentally responsible projects, and effectively inform our processes.

Note: Pre-conference workshops are an add-on to your conference registration

1:00 PM – 5:00 PM

Workshop: Modeling an Approach to the Design of Lighting Control Systems

Presenters: Ruth Taylor, Daniel Blitzer, Jessica Collier
4 CEU credits

Too often the design of lighting controls begins with a favored proprietary system. This tends to limit choices, especially for those without deep controls experience. But it doesn’t have to be this way.

In this workshop, participants will model an interactive decision framework, an alternative independent of specific manufacturer systems. Participants will explore how controls objectives suggest appropriate system capabilities, how technology variables shape cost and risk parameters, and how system architectures support or limit the desired outcomes. Working with hypothetical spaces, participants will also create a Controls Design Intent based on the decisions made though the framework.

Pre-requisite: Basic familiarity with lighting controls

Note: Pre-conference workshops are an add-on to your conference registration

1:00 PM – 5:00 PM

Workshop:Understanding Light and Color by Seeing and Doing

Presenter: Robert Davis
4 CEU credits

“I hear and I forget, I see and I remember, I do and I understand.” If you work in lighting, you have most likely heard of the IES TM-30 color rendering metrics and have gained some familiarity with color rendering concepts such as fidelity, gamut, hue shifts, and saturation changes, along with some of the technical details of color vector graphics and hue bins. But for most of us, this familiarity has mostly come from hearing webinars and presentations with lots of graphs and numbers that explain the new TM-30 metrics and compare them to the traditional CRI. This workshop is designed to deepen your understanding through a series of hands-on, eyes-on small group exercises. These guided exercises will strengthen your ability to apply color rendering metrics to lighting design problems by grounding them in your own personal visual experiences and through hands-on use of the TM-30 tools and reports. By seeing and doing, you will be better equipped to remember and understand!

Note: Pre-conference workshops are an add-on to your conference registration.

7:00 AM – 8:00 AM

EP/Leadership Forum Breakfast

 

8:00 AM – 11:40 PM

Emerging Professionals Day

AGENDA

  • 8-8:15:  Meet the President
    • President: Billy Tub
  • 8:15-8:30: Tribute to Howard Brandston
    • History of his career, devotion to education, and EPs in particular
    • Speaker: Dan Salinas
  • 8:30-9:45: Local Rep/Distributor/Manufacturer Panel
    • Agent: Julie Blankenheim, Principal, Chicago Lightworks
    • Manufacturer: Brian Maite, National Director, Leviton Lighting
    • Distributor: Rick Kerman, Chairman/Owner, Steiner Electric
    • Contractor: Tim Kellenberger, CEO/Owner, Kellenberger Electric
    • Moderator: Mark Roush
  • 9:45-10:00: Mid-morning break
  • 10:00-11:40: Speed Networking Seasoned Industry Professionals
    • 10 minutes per professional
  • 11:40-12:00: Gather for Busses/Travel to Acuity
  • 12-4 pm: Acuity Training Event (Includes Lunch)
    • Title: Bright Minds, Responsible Lighting: An Immersive Experience with Acuity Brands (Please see below)

11:40 AM – 4:00 PM

Emerging Professionals Day

Field Trip

In this three-hour event, you will tour Acuity Brands Des Plaines lighting manufacturing and distribution facility to learn how lighting fixtures are brought to market, including industry standard photometric testing,  manufacturing and distribution.  Vignettes and instructor-led demonstrations will reinforce use cases for a variety of lighting techniques, luminaire types and common terminology focusing on sustainable design practices.

 

  • Identify various luminaire types and their place in interior and exterior building applications.
  • Define and discuss common terminology as it relates to luminaires and their use.
  • Recall the path to market of luminaires and other lighting equipment from concept to end-of-life disposal.
  • Recognize the key elements of sustainability & their impacts including Embodied & Operational Carbon, Materials Responsibility & Workplace Social Responsibility as they pertain to creating, manufacturing, specifying, delivering and installing luminaires.

 

Credit AIA 3 LU | HSW Credits / FBPEILT 3 PDH Credits

8:00 AM – 3:00 PM

Leadership Forum

The IES Leadership Forum is the year’s most vital event for Section Leaders. This day-long program will give you the tools and information necessary to successfully lead your section and ensure that your section thrives! This year’s Leadership Forum will include roundtable discussions, membership growth best practices, and a DEIR Q&A, among other valuable lessons. If you are involved in Section Leadership at any level, please make sure to select Leadership Forum when registering for the Annual Conference.

11:00 AM – 3:00 PM

Past Presidents Lunch

5:00 PM – 6:00 PM

Illumination Awards Reception

6:00 PM – 8:00 PM

2023 Illumination Awards Gala

Celebrate the best in lighting and the 50th anniversary of the IES Illumination Awards!

8:00 PM – 10:00 PM

Illumination Awards After Party

With thanks to Title Sponsor; Acuity Brands

7:00 AM – 8:00 AM

Breakfast

8:00 AM – 8:30 AM

Morning General Session

8:30 AM – 9:30 AM

Speaker: Mark Lien, IES Industry Relations

1 CEU

9:30 AM – 6:30 PM

Tabletop Exhibits Open 

10:00 AM – 11:00 AM

Plenary Session

Speakers: Dane Sanders, Nick Mesler

1 CEU

Clanton and Associates worked with Salt Lake City from 2018 to 2020 to develop the Salt Lake City Lighting Master Plan, a significant shift in how Salt Lake City utilizes streetlights while balancing multiple values, including safety, character, equity and responsibility to public health and the environment. This came from the understanding that artificial light at night has impacts on each of these values, and a commitment to do better.

This presentation will discuss how the public engagement process and GIS data sources were utilized to develop the guideposts and comprehensive strategies of the Salt Lake City Street Lighting Master Plan. As this Street Lighting Master Plan is implemented over time, the street and pedestrian lighting will transition to utilizing dark sky strategies by reducing upward light, applying warmer color temperatures based on adjacent land uses, adaptive dimming strategies, and controlling light trespass.

11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Plenary Session

Speakers: Shirley Coyle

1 CEU

As awareness increases in multiple areas, the lighting community is thinking differently about outdoor lighting practice. Learn how changes in thinking may translate into practical changes in our outdoor lighting standards – as we incorporate learnings on Light & Human Health, Ecological Impact on Flora & Fauna, Light & Justice, and Dark Sky.

12:00 PM – 1:15 PM

Lunch & Tabletop Exhibits

1:15 PM – 2:15 PM

Breakout Sessions

Speaker: Karen Murphy

1 CEU

This session requires active participation. This session will review how to develop a business plan for lighting services. Will step through a progression of questions that will help attendees review and update their business plans. Business plan items that apply to independent lighting businesses as well as lighting departments within larger organizations will be discussed. We will explore goals and how to achieve them through well-crafted business plans. We will learn from each other and identify how to create and modify plans to form sustainable businesses.

Speaker: Ken Walczak

1 CEU

The Overview Effect has been described as a cognitive shift experienced by astronauts viewing the Earth from space. It can inspire “an overwhelming and increased sense of connection to other people and the Earth as a whole”. What could we learn if we had an Overview Effect for outdoor light at night?

Using an innovative imaging system flown on stratospheric high-altitude balloons – researchers, students and volunteers at the Adler Planetarium have mapped our world at night to reveal a new perspective on how we use outdoor lighting. We will show results from data collected over Indianapolis and how these nighttime maps can help inform responsible outdoor lighting practices. Our data reveals the primary sources of excessive upward light at night, the disparities in light emission and reveals strategies to best mitigate light pollution and lighting design for a better future for people and the Earth as a whole.

Papers/Technical Presentations

Presenter: Nina Sharp

In this study, we investigated the effect of a dynamic lighting intervention on sleep quality, depression, and agitation in older adults with dementia living in long-term care facilities. The study was conducted as a within-subject study design over 7 days of conventional lighting (Baseline) followed by 21 days of room lighting (Placebo) and then 21 days of dynamic lighting (Treatment). Findings suggested that lighting in memory care facilities plays a crucial role in enhancing the quality of life and sleep for older adults with dementia.

Presenter: Nina Sharp

In this study, we investigated the effects of applying a biodynamic lighting intervention in home offices on sleep quality, cognitive performance, and alertness in remote workers. Participants were involved in a five-week experiment. Each participant underwent a home screening visit and then had a one-week period of conventional lighting exposure to establish a baseline. Following this, they received two weeks of either biodynamic lighting or placebo lighting during the workday. In both interventions, participants received a similar dosage of circadian lighting throughout the working hours which was in accordance with the WELL Standard V2 guidelines for circadian lighting (275lux); however, the “time factor” was disregarded in the placebo condition. The results of this study offer compelling evidence that lighting is a crucial aspect of home-based work environments that has a significant impact on remote workers’ cognitive performance which has a direct bearing on the health and productivity of employees.

Presenter: Naomi Miller

The phantom array effect visibility has been investigated for 10 years or more, but no dataset has been complete enough for developing a visibility measure until now. Following the psychophysical procedure of other TLM metrics such as Mp and SVM, this paper presents its development and possible target values.

Presenter: Naomi Miller

Light sources located ≥60° vertically above the line of sight have conventionally been excluded from glare calculations. But then why do we wear baseball caps in bright overhead sunshine? The PNNL laboratory has conducted a human factors experiment to explore the response to glare sources at different positions to explore this issue, as well as looking at how two different SPDs affect the glare response. This talk will address some of the preliminary results.

2:15 PM – 3:15 PM

Breakout Sessions

Speakers: Shoshanna Segal, Carol C. Jones

1 CEU

With so many different types of systems and requirements, how do you get what you really want from lighting controls? Designers and architects need to consider the visual environment they are creating as well as the operational characteristics of the systems being installed. Design teams now often find themselves faced with questions of how to create a level of interoperability and digital integration with adjacent building systems that was not so commonplace in the recent past. Fortunately, the tools exist to articulate both the designer’s intent and the specific steps required to achieve that intent. By examining the development process behind the Control Intent Narrative and the Sequence of Operations, this seminar will provide guidance for assembling these documents and specific examples of language that is both clear and contractually enforceable.

Presenter: Nick Mesler

1 CEU

This presentation will cover regional street lighting design at scale and the considerations required beyond the standards. Through real project examples, attendees will gain insights into how regional illumination photometrics can identify existing lighting shortfalls, leading to improved decision-making and recommendations. The session will cover the integration of streetlighting considerations into comprehensive planning, addressing competing needs, promoting equity, and fostering collaboration with stakeholders.

Papers/Technical Presentations

Presenter: Jason Tuenge

This technical presentation will share findings from the first round of germicidal ultraviolet (GUV) product testing through the US Department of Energy’s CALiPER program. Electrical, radiometric, and photobiological safety testing was performed for three types of LED and low-pressure mercury (LPM) products: portable towers, whole-room luminaires for vacant spaces, and whole-room luminaires for occupied spaces.

Presenter: Rugved Kore

This session will give you insights on evaluation of the suitability of a mini-spectrometer and a RGB sensor as a wearable device. Various lighting conditions were measured using these two devices, and the data were compared with a calibrated spectroradiometer to analyze their accuracy.

Presenter: Jesús Obando

Light can be used as a means to create atmospheres in spaces that can influence mood, emotion, behavior, spatial impression and preference. In addition, it can impact the human biological clock by regulating multiple body functions such as sleep patterns, cognitive performance, mood, well-being, and hormone release and production. From this complex situation described above, about the effects of light on people, the interest of the present research work arises. The objective of this research is to determine the preferences of users of different age groups in relation to the various technological alternatives in indoor residential lighting.

Presenter: Mahya Fani

The study aims to investigate the extent to which interior features, including seating layouts and wall color and reflection, can affect the non-visual effects of daylight to increase daylight-driven circadian stimulus within a design-studio learning environment. The results suggest that the circadian potential of the space is positively correlated with the melanopic reflectance of the wall materials and the collaborative desk arrangement. These findings provide valuable insights for designers who wish to enhance daylight-driven circadian stimulus in flexible and collaborative learning environments, such as design-studio classrooms, while preserving the space’s geometrical characteristics.

3:30 PM – 4:30 PM

Breakout Sessions

Speaker: Robert Soler

1 CEU

The lighting industry has become more comfortable with the idea that light can impact our physiology beyond vision. The industry has battled internally over which metric to use, what criteria to meet and how long to meet said criteria. As we’re finally starting to find conclusion to these debates, one point of clarity remains. Circadian lighting and wellness lighting are not the same thing, nor should they be applied in the same way.

Through a combination of peer reviewed literature and translational overview, this talk will cover what circadian lighting is and what outcomes we can expect from circadian lighting. This talk will also cover what wellness lighting is and what we can expect from wellness lighting. It will cover how we should be thinking about applying each one in a variety of different settings including home, office, healthcare facilities and more.

Speakers: Brittany Lynch, Lisa Reed

1 CEU

Before the pandemic, retaining women talent in the lighting industry was strained. Women enter the workforce in the same capacity as their male counterparts. Yet if you look at company leadership, women are under-represented. At IALD in 2018, the question was posed: Why do women leave lighting design? The presentation revealed that mothers left lighting design due to their high demanding career colliding with their seemingly insurmountable parenting responsibilities.

Fast forward to September 2020, the whole country took note when over 850,000 women dropped out of the workforce. It became clear in the midst of the pandemic that schools were moving to online learning. In a moment of intense pressure, mothers stepped away from their salaries, careers, stability to teach America’s future generations. While mothers and caretakers have returned to the workforce, it still does not match pre-pandemic levels.

It’s time to take a step back and evaluate how companies are supporting our nation’s caregivers to retain valuable design talent. Four years later, we will follow up with the question: How do you retain working parents?

Papers/Technical Presentations

Presenter: Paolo Creati

Presentation description coming soon

Presenters: Lydia Simpson

Building on the 2016 study “Migraine photophobia originating in cone-driven retinal pathways.” and the 2000 study “The wavelength of light causing photophobia in migraine and tension-type headache between attacks.”, Shining a Light on Migraines looks at how different spectral distributions of green light affected the discomfort threshold of participants with and without migraines. The selected colors were based on the idea that green light is the least bothersome color of light for migraine-related photophobia while blue and red wavelengths of light are the most bothersome. While prior studies looked at narrow spectral distributions of primary colors, this study explores the spectrum between blue and red to see at what point green switches from therapeutic to bothersome.

Presenter: Michael Myer

In 2012, Williams et al, published a meta-analysis of lighting controls in commercial buildings. The underlying research that formed the meta-analysis primarily involved conventional lighting sources (non-light-emitting diode [LED]). The meta-analysis found “24% for occupancy sensors; 28% for daylighting; 31% for personal tuning; 36% for institutional tuning; and 38% for multiple approaches. ” Beyond the meta-analysis not including LED-based research, this research primarily involved zone-based lighting controls and not networked / luminaire level lighting controls (LLLC). Neither LEDs nor networked controls were prevalent prior to 2012.
In contrast, DesignLights Consortium (DLC) published in 2017 a study focused on savings from networked lighting controls (NLC) . This analysis involved 114 projects that included LEDs and NLC (some not all, LLLC systems). This DLC analysis found an average savings of 47% for NLC. DLC included a comparison of average savings from the NLC analysis with other studies. DLC specifically cited the 38% from Williams et al 2012 and the 47% value DLC found.
Neither of those analyses reported disaggregated savings withing the space for the different control schemes. This paper presents disaggregated energy savings across the space. This paper will provide an estimate of daylight savings from different distances from the vertical fenestration. This paper will demonstrate occupancy sensor savings based on sensor size.

Presenter: David Bratt, John Grepe

The need for connected emergency lighting stems primarily from the time, labor, and cost savings of completely automating the testing and reporting process to ensure the emergency lighting system remains fully operational and ready to perform when it is needed. The time and cost required to perform the testing and reporting becomes exorbitant even for moderately sized facilities. Using the technology now available to connect the emergency lighting system so the testing can be completed automatically at a time when it is convenient for a particular facility, can dramatically reduce the time and money needed to keep the system in tip-top condition. This presentation is designed to explain this in more detail and describe the various methods to achieve a connected emergency lighting system so the attendee can make a more informed decision on how to apply what is currently available today. One possible method will be explored in more depth. Again, the end result is to ensure the safety of occupants in a facility by having a fully operational emergency lighting system in place AND to save the time and money involved in keeping it that way.

4:30 PM – 6:00 PM

Progress Report 

The mission of the Progress Report is to keep in touch with developments in the art and science of lighting throughout the world and prepare a yearly report of achievements for the Society. Acceptance is based on an impartial judging process used by the committee to evaluate each submission on its uniqueness, innovation and significance to the lighting industry.

6:00 PM – 7:00 PM

Tabletop exhibit reception

7:00 PM – 9:30 PM

Friday Night Lights Platinum Sponsored Event

Sponsored by Cooper Lighting Solutions

7:00 AM – 8:00 AM

Breakfast

7:00 AM – 8:00 AM

Fellows Breakfast

7:00 AM – 1:30 PM

Tabletop Exhibits Open

8:00 AM – 9:00 AM

Morning General Session

9:00 AM – 10:00 AM

Plenary Session

Speaker: Kimberly Mercier

1 CEU

As creators of electric light, we elect to ignore our historic condition of living in nature’s light and, in so doing, we impact our health and wellbeing. If it were true, however, that we were impacting our physiological wellbeing, it would be obvious and there would be standards, and recommendations, and best practices…right?

In this presentation, the speaker will explore the evolving nature of lighting research related to light and health. She will share thought leader opinions about the race to create standards, the market conditions that are driving the light and human health environment, design considerations and challenges given the recommendations available, and suggestions for incorporating human health considerations in the lighting projects you are currently designing and building.

New discoveries in light and human health will change how the design community thinks about lighting design, implementation, control, lighting product manufacturing and availability, and our decisions about the lighting energy we spend. Let’s affect change with light!

controlling light trespass.

10:15 AM – 11:15 AM

Plenary Session

Speakers: Naomi Miller, Lia Irvin

1 CEU

Temporal Light Modulation (TLM) is an increasing phenomenon in indoor, outdoor, and vehicular applications, due to the widespread adoption of LED sources. Less than half of LED lighting systems produce problematic TLM, but it is common in small-profile linear luminaires, decorative fixtures, residential luminaires, screw base LED retrofit lamps, holiday light strings, vehicular tail lights, daytime running lights, dashboard displays, and even headlights. Unfortunately, there has been a delayed recognition that certain TLM waveform characteristics and viewing conditions can result in distraction and disorientation, cognitive effects, and serious health consequences in some populations. The neurological impacts may occur with or without conscious visibility of the TLM.

Research into responses to TLM is underway, but guidance is needed now, since anecdotal evidence suggests a link to migraines, nausea and disorientation, and even more serious health consequences. Until there is more evidence, we need provisional guidelines to raise awareness among dimmer, driver, and luminaire manufacturers.

11:15 AM – 12:15 PM

Plenary Session

Speaker: Ruth Taylor

1 CEU

The problem with lighting controls is people. You can run an entire conference about what people don’t know: how to use controls, how to repair controls that don’t work, how to configure networked systems, how to describe the systems they want or produce, and more. But what is being done?

Education, at least that is the typical answer. If we want to change the “how to”, the behaviors of market participants, maybe it’s time for some new tools to enhance the training of key under-represented sectors of the market.

This presentation outlines how the Department of Energy is developing new training priorities and methods in order to improve the effectiveness of lighting controls. For the last five years, DOE’s Next Generation Lighting Systems project has used observational research to characterize the problems at the various points where people interact with lighting controls. Ruth Taylor will describe the several research-based techniques that her team is developing with the goal of changing behaviors in the market.

12:15 PM – 1:30 PM

Lunch & Tabletop Exhibits

1:30 PM – 2:30 PM

Breakout Sessions

Speaker: Lyn Gomes, Michael Poplawski

1 CEU

A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away, DG-29, the standard for commissioning of lighting, was created. Time has passed, the industry has matured, and technology has advanced to the point that this standard required a major update both in content and name. When released later this year, it will become ANSI/IES LP-8, the Standard for Commissioning for Lighting and Lighting Control Systems. This document is a resource not only for commissioning providers, but also for the commissioning team (e.g., owners, architects, designers, engineers, contractors, distributors).

Master Yoda didn’t become a Jedi overnight – it was a process of mind and body training. Similarly, Commissioning is a systematic process (a series of discreet activities) that seeks to enhance delivery of a project. It focuses on verifying and documenting that all the commissioned systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the Owner’s Project Requirements (OPR). Commissioning starts in the predesign phase, continues into occupancy, and throughout the building’s lifetime. COMMISSIONING IS NOT STARTUP.

The update will improve on the original and serve as a practical, boots-on-the-ground resource for commissioning of lighting and lighting control systems that can be read and utilized in standalone sections. It will cover commissioning for large and small projects. Improvements include best practices, updates to outdated information, and align with ASHRAE Guideline 0 and the Building Commissioning Association’s Best Practices. (Commissioning providers will recognize these documents as the equivalent of the Jedi Path for Jedi Initiates.) It defines responsibilities for key members of the commissioning team and describes scope and sets minimum performance criteria for commissioning providers. Entirely new sections were created, including commissioning for existing buildings (aka retrocommissioning). Sample resources were added, including functional tests, design review checklists, and OPR and BOD examples and questionnaires.

As technology advances, so must the practice of commissioning. Our committee recognized this need and created content to explore future of the commissioning process. This presentation will be given by committee members (including a Jedi Commissioning Master) and serve as a pre-release preview of the standard. Come to this presentation to glean insights into best practices and weigh in on the future for true commissioning.

Speaker: Paige Donnell

1 CEU

While the concept of employee wellness has always been an important discussion topic, physical and nutritional health are more often prioritized while social, intellectual, and emotional health are not as actively analyzed and addressed. A key tool for addressing these often-overlooked wellness factors is mentorship: a holistic investment in our internal teaming, fulfillment, collaboration, productivity, project success, leadership development, and collective office-wide wellbeing. Throughout this talk, we will reveal a working model of mentorship and emphasize the role it plays in recruitment, staff engagement, leadership development, and retainment along with easy-to-integrate actions to enhance alignment, team dynamics, and goals.

Papers/Technical Presentations

Presenter: Mary Guzowski

This paper explores daylighting relationships between six bio-inspired design frameworks for nature-based strategies in architecture, including: biophilic, bioregional, bioclimatic, biomimetic, biomorphic, and biomaterial perspectives. How are these frameworks related, distinct, and/or integrated? The six bio-inspired frameworks discussed in this paper provide related but varied perspectives on nature and biology-inspired daylighting design. Integrating daylighting with one or more of these bio-inspired approaches is a strategic method to promote passive and low-energy strategies toward net-positive energy and sustainable design goals while simultaneously leveraging health benefits for humans, other species, and the planet.

Presenter: Abdulrahman Aljuhani, Richard Mistrick

Daylight Glare Probability (DGP) is impacted by both the vertical illuminance at an observer and characteristics of the glare source. This paper illustrates how different shade properties, as well as a view of the sun through the shades, impacts the predicted level of DGP.

Presenter: Tony Esposito

Using a simulation based on a real, five-channel tunable LED lighting system, we show that Correlated Color Temperature (CCT) is not a reasonable predictor of the biological potency of light, whether characterized with CIE melanopic Equivalent Daylight Illuminance (mel-EDI), Equivalent Melanopic Lux (EML) (a scalar multiple of mel-EDI), or Circadian Stimulus (CS). At a photopic corneal illuminance of 300 lx and Rf ≥ 70, spectra can vary in CS from 17 to 41% across CCTs from 2500 to 6000 K, and up to 23% at a single CCT, due to the choice of spectrum alone. The CS range is largest, and notably discontinuous, at a CCT of 3500 K, the location of the inflection point of the CS model. At a photopic corneal illuminance of 300 lx and Rf ≥ 70, mel-EDI can vary from 123 to 354 lx across CCTs from 2500 to 6000 K and can vary by up to 123 lx at a fixed CCT (e.g., 196 to 319 lx at 5000 K). The range of achievable mel-EDI increases as CCT increases and, on average, decreases as color fidelity, characterized with IES TM-30 Rf, increases. These data demonstrate that there is no easy mathematical conversion between CS and mel-EDI when a spectrally diverse spectra set of spectral power distributions is considered.

Presenters: Nayoun Ryu, Craig Bernecker

In a twenty block walk from 14th street to 34th street in New York, there are twenty sidewalk sheds covering a portion of each block. That means pedestrians spend almost half of their journey under a sidewalk shed. The common perception of a sidewalk shed is that it is a temporary construction, but in practice, many sidewalk sheds have been in place for over a year, with lighting conditions under the sheds an important consideration for pedestrians on a daily basis. Sidewalk sheds are a common sight in New York City, providing protection for pedestrians and property during construction. With over 9,000 active sheds and more than 2 million total linear feet, they have become a signature feature of the city’s urban landscape, particularly in Manhattan. However, while sidewalk sheds serve an important physical safety function, they also come with certain challenges, such as issues with lighting that can also impact safety.

2:30 PM – 3:30 PM

Breakout Sessions

Speakers: Chris Sorensen

1 CEU

What is the definition of a sustainable luminaire? A broad view of the environmental impact of lighting encompasses so much more than energy consumed. A deeper look at how luminaires are designed, manufactured, and used exposes a plethora of opportunities to reduce their impact. The future of product development in the lighting industry will be driven by sustainability.

Speakers: Harold Jepsen, Nancy Clanton, Matt Hartley, Jim Gaines

1 CEU

This panel discussion takes a proactive look at responsibly addressing lighting glare with the UGR metric. Using an application-based approach, we’ll cover key UGR principles, as well as its pitfalls, to effectively design for human health, wellness and comfort.

Papers/Technical Presentations

Presenter: Wangyang Song

Photometric measures based on CIE 2-degree standard observer have been utilized to predict scene brightness with mixed results. This study presents a method to evaluate corneal illuminance as an indicator to predict scene brightness.

Presenter: Yuwei Wang

Color contrast influences visual attention, recognition, comprehension, and aesthetic preference. This presentation will report findings of a study investigating the effect of color contrast on the visual clarity of complex visual environments.

Presenters: Maria Nilsson Tengelin, Stefan Källberg

In this presentation we show a method to investigate insect response to different luminance levels to find a threshold level for positive phototaxis. The set-up comprises a box with wide-angle cameras, near infrared LEDs and a luminance source with variable output. The activity level and pattern of movement at different light levels are demonstrated for Greater Wax Moth (Galleria Mellonella).

Presenters: Maria Nilsson Tengelin, Stefan Källberg

In this presentation, we will show a method with a sensitive light meter on a drone to measure light that is scattered up into the night sky. Measurements at different heights combined with images from the drone’s camera quickly provide a good overview of large areas and light sources contributing to light pollution. Specifically, we have investigated how light from a road lighting system is spread for different color temperatures and optics depending on the environment.

3:45 PM – 4:45 PM

Breakout Sessions

Speaker: Fanny Soulard

1 CEU

This presentation is an invitation to overcome and question our unconscious biases by investigating how we can play better with each one’s differences while designing a lighting project in a culturally diverse context.

The assessment of three study cases located in Vietnam will help to understand the cultural impact on a project elaboration and reveal how ICI – Inter-Cultural Intelligence- tools can generate significant benefits for individuals, teams, companies, and communities.

A role-playing game will close this session by inviting volunteers to express their opinion toward a given situation involving interculturality.

Speakers: Alp Durmus, Annika Jagerbrand, Maria Nilsson Tengelin

1 CEU

Light at night (LAN) enables us to enjoy outdoors at night, cultivates economic growth, and increases the perception of safety. Unfortunately, LAN has been connected to adverse health outcomes, such as circadian disruption, mood effects, and increased breast cancer incidence risk in humans. While the negative impacts of LAN at night, often referred to as light pollution, has gained popularity, the studies that lead to this body of knowledge were seldom under scrutiny. This talk will focus on not just what we know about light pollution and its circadian impacts on humans, but also how do we know what we know, specifically critically analyzing the methods and limitations of the light pollution studies.

Responsibly illuminating outdoor environments at night requires a better understanding of the impacts and the reasons for the documented impacts. Studies investigating health outcomes of LAN utilize a variety of methods sometimes resulting in conflicting outcomes. We conducted a systematic review focusing on the experimental methods and health outcomes of LAN studies conducted in lab, in-situ, and longitudinal studies. While most studies found a negative impact of LAN on human health, lighting conditions were not adequately reported or controlled in many cases. We will discuss best practices for future work investigating LAN effects on human health outcomes and emphasize the need for a multidisciplinary approach to improve the scientific quality of research studies. We will also provide recommendations for outdoor lighting practice to reduce negative impacts on human health.

Papers/Technical Presentations

Presenter: Mahya Fani

This study aims to assess the extent to which geometrical and optical properties of partitions, including their material, height and layout, affect the circadian potential of an open-plan office space. Results indicate that, generally, the circadian potential of the office space rises with the increase of the melanopic reflectance of the partition material and the decrease of partition height. With partitions higher than the eye level, arranging them in a parallel position to the window would result in higher EML levels, whereas with the lower partition heights, the perpendicular arrangement of partitions to the window would be a more suitable choice regarding the circadian lighting conditions in most of the investigated cases.

Presenter: Sarah Safranek, Corey Strachan

Relatively new metrics for characterizing the impact of light on non-visual physiological responses in humans has necessitated the development of spectral simulation tools that estimate the quantity and spectrum of light in the built environment. These spectral simulation tools increase the number of bands used to represent the color of materials and light sources to calculate metrics like equivalent melanopic lux (EML), which has a different spectral sensitivity than illuminance. One such tool, ALFA, is a Radiance-based commercial software that allows for spectral simulations using 81 bands, ideal for representing the spectral power distribution (SPD) of LED light sources. This presentation will 1) provide an overview of the spectral simulation workflow, including the current availability of spectral data; and 2) discuss the results of a analysis aimed identifying potential sources of error that may result from reasonable assumptions made throughout the design process.

Presenter: Michael Myer

The Zonal Cavity Method (also known as “Lumen Method”) has primarily been used to determine the average illuminance for interior applications. There are few calculation methods for calculating the average illuminance for exterior applications. A calculation has existed for calculating roadway illuminance, but a method for calculating average illuminance for non-roadway calculations currently has not been published.

Presenter: Michael Myer

Richman et al published An Empirical Data Based Method for Development of Lighting Energy Standards first as part of the 1998 IES Annual and then later in 1999 in the Journal of the IES. Since this publication, this method has been the primary method for establishing energy code lighting power densities for ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1 until the 2019 version.

4:45 PM – 5:45 PM

Keynote Speaker: Eric Corey Freed, RA, LFA, LEED Fellow, EcoDistricts AP
Principal, Sustainability Director
CannonDesign

1 CEU

Imagine a building that can boost immune response, lower blood pressure, or speed collaboration efforts. By tapping into biology, we can trigger these specific outcomes through the Architecture. In this talk, we’ll explore how to design student and health facilities that boost your biological responses.

We’ll explore a new approach to achieving high performance educational facilities using a symbiotic mindset to design in ways that triggers your biology to improve your health and outcomes. We’ll explore the six categories of symbiosis: Systems, Senses, Signals, Cycles, Biomes, and Genomes, to uncover new approaches to boost student test scores, lower stress levels, or speed comprehension.

As we move from the Digital Age to the Biological Age, the line between the natural and the manmade will start to disappear. In this talk, we’ll explore how to embrace biology as the ultimate technology to develop a new approach to sustainable design that affect the people who live, work and play in our buildings.

Imagine if we designed our buildings to work WITH our biology? In this session, we’ll explore this new paradigm for sustainability that combines biophilia, with evidence-based design, with wellness to create a new approach to designing healthy buildings. We’ll explore how we can design a building that triggers specific physiological responses in students and staff using physiological systems, human senses, circadian rhythm, neurotransmitters, and microbiomes to transform how we provide care and learning. We’ll look at how to deploy next generation materials that are “build with biology” to introduce a radical approach to wellness.

Eric gets into “good trouble” a lot these days. That’s because he’s not afraid to speak up against traditional ways of designing and building. The built environment is one of the largest contributors of carbon dioxide emissions in the world. He’s fixated on changing that.

Eric believes in moving toward a future where regenerative and restorative buildings become the standard. Whether facilitating client workshops about carbon-smart design or rallying crowds of thousands around the need for a circular economy, his message is the same: we have the tools needed to slow and even reverse the impacts of climate change—but we must act now.

 

About Eric:
Eric Corey Freed is an award-winning architect, author, and global speaker. As Principal and Director of Sustainability for CannonDesign, he leads the healthcare, education, and commercial teams toward low-carbon, healthy, regenerative buildings for over 30 million square feet a year. For two decades, he was Founding Principal of organicARCHITECT, a visionary design leader in biophilic and regenerative design. 

His past roles include Vice President of the International Living Future Institute and Chief Community Officer of EcoDistricts, both nonprofits pushing innovative new paradigms for deep green buildings and communities. He serves on the board of Design Museum Everywhere, whose mission is to “bring the transformative power of design to all.”

Eric is the author of 12 books, including “Green Building & Remodeling for Dummies” and “Circular Economy for Dummies.” In 2012, he was named one of the 25 “Best Green Architecture Firms” in the US, and one of the “Top 10 Most Influential Green Architects.” In 2017, he was named one of Build’s American Architecture Top 25. He holds a prestigious LEED Fellow award from the US Green Building Council.

Speaker Sessions (60 minutes, including 10-15 minutes for questions): 
Deadline for Submission – March 12, 2023

Formats can include interactive sessions, lectures, and roundtable discussions. While the traditional lecture-style presentation is a fine and trusted format, we encourage you to be creative in your approach and welcome submissions that use video, live demonstrations, audience interaction, and other techniques to create new experiences for conference attendees.

Recommended topics speaker sessions:

  • Environment and Sustainability 
  • Light & Human Health 
  • Humanities and Ethics 
  • Art and Process of Design 
  • Application of New and Emerging Technologies 

If there is more than one presenter for the submitted presentation, all presenters’ names, bios and affiliations must be included the submission.

If you are submitting more than one presentation, a new submission must be created for each individual presentation.

 


Posters:

Deadline for Submission – April 30, 2023

Posters will be evaluated for inclusion based on submission of an extended abstract that consists of up to 3 pages (maximum 800 Words). Authors are encouraged to include figures in their abstract to convey information on the details and/or findings which will be covered in the poster.

We are looking forward to seeing you in:

2023 Event Registration Rates

Early bird - Hotel Block Early bird NO - Hotel Block Regular - Hotel Block Regular NO - Hotel Block
Full Reg w/ Gala - members $899 $999 $999 $1,099
Full Reg w/ Gala - non-members $1,169 $1,269 $1,269 $1,369
Full Reg - member $699 $799 $799 $899
Full Reg - non- member $969 $1,069 $1,069 $1,169
EP/ full reg w/Gala $629 $729 $699 $799
Student full reg w/Gala $429 $529 $499 $599
EP/ full reg w/o Gala $429 $529 $499 $599
Retired/Emerits full reg w/Gala $629 $729 $699 $799
Retired/Emerits full reg w/o Gala $429 $529 $499 $599
One Day Pass - member $499 $499 $499 $499
One Day Pass - non member $599 $599 $599 $599

Tabletops

Tabletops 2023
Member $4,250
Non member $4,750

Workshops

Workshops 2023
Member $150
Non member $250

Download the IES Annual Conference App

– View the event agenda
– View session information, access documents and check in
– View speaker, exhibitor and sponsor information
– View event and venue information
– Reply to polls
– Reply to surveys
– Send messages to attendees and speakers
– Schedule meetings with other attendees
– Receive important updates about the event
– Rate sessions, speakers and events
– Connect with other attendees

Tentative Agenda at a Glance

Registration Type Rate
(Jun 27-Aug 18)
Full Registration with Illumination Awards Gala (IES Members) $999 USD
Full Registration with Illumination Awards Gala (Non-Member) $1,269 USD
Full Registration (IES Member) $799 USD
Full Registration (Non-Member) $1,069 USD
Full Registration with Illumination Awards Gala (Emerging Professional) $699 USD
Full Registration with Illumination Awards Gala (Student) $499 USD
Full Registration without IA Gala (Emerging Professional) $499 USD
Full Registration with Illumination Awards Gala (Retired/Emeritus Member) $699 USD
Full Registration without IA Gala (Retired/Emeritus Member) $499 USD
Member One-Day Pass $499 - $599 USD
Non-Member One-Day Pass $669 - $869 USD

1:00 PM – 5:00 PM

Workshop: Computational Parametric Workflows

Presenters: Reinhardt Swart, Nathan Sharnas, Rick Mistrick
4 CEU credits

Built projects and design processes are becoming more complex and data-driven, leaving designers to respond to a growing list of demands. Advancements in software enable parametric workflows that allow designers to model complex design spaces and advance sustainable strategies. This workshop will explore these workflows, using Rhino 3D modeling software and the Grasshopper plug-in to simulate and analyze daylighting performance, design environmentally responsible projects, and effectively inform our processes.

Note: Pre-conference workshops are an add-on to your conference registration

1:00 PM – 5:00 PM

Workshop: Modeling an Approach to the Design of Lighting Control Systems

Presenters: Ruth Taylor, Daniel Blitzer, Jessica Collier
4 CEU credits

Too often the design of lighting controls begins with a favored proprietary system. This tends to limit choices, especially for those without deep controls experience. But it doesn’t have to be this way.

In this workshop, participants will model an interactive decision framework, an alternative independent of specific manufacturer systems. Participants will explore how controls objectives suggest appropriate system capabilities, how technology variables shape cost and risk parameters, and how system architectures support or limit the desired outcomes. Working with hypothetical spaces, participants will also create a Controls Design Intent based on the decisions made though the framework.

Pre-requisite: Basic familiarity with lighting controls

Note: Pre-conference workshops are an add-on to your conference registration

1:00 PM – 5:00 PM

Workshop:Understanding Light and Color by Seeing and Doing

Presenter: Robert Davis
4 CEU credits

“I hear and I forget, I see and I remember, I do and I understand.” If you work in lighting, you have most likely heard of the IES TM-30 color rendering metrics and have gained some familiarity with color rendering concepts such as fidelity, gamut, hue shifts, and saturation changes, along with some of the technical details of color vector graphics and hue bins. But for most of us, this familiarity has mostly come from hearing webinars and presentations with lots of graphs and numbers that explain the new TM-30 metrics and compare them to the traditional CRI. This workshop is designed to deepen your understanding through a series of hands-on, eyes-on small group exercises. These guided exercises will strengthen your ability to apply color rendering metrics to lighting design problems by grounding them in your own personal visual experiences and through hands-on use of the TM-30 tools and reports. By seeing and doing, you will be better equipped to remember and understand!

Note: Pre-conference workshops are an add-on to your conference registration.

7:00 AM – 8:00 AM

EP/Leadership Forum Breakfast

 

8:00 AM – 11:40 PM

Emerging Professionals Day

AGENDA

  • 8-8:15:  Meet the President
    • President: Billy Tub
  • 8:15-8:30: Tribute to Howard Brandston
    • History of his career, devotion to education, and EPs in particular
    • Speaker: Dan Salinas
  • 8:30-9:45: Local Rep/Distributor/Manufacturer Panel
    • Agent: Julie Blankenheim, Principal, Chicago Lightworks
    • Manufacturer: Brian Maite, National Director, Leviton Lighting
    • Distributor: Rick Kerman, Chairman/Owner, Steiner Electric
    • Contractor: Tim Kellenberger, CEO/Owner, Kellenberger Electric
    • Moderator: Mark Roush
  • 9:45-10:00: Mid-morning break
  • 10:00-11:40: Speed Networking Seasoned Industry Professionals
    • 10 minutes per professional
  • 11:40-12:00: Gather for Busses/Travel to Acuity
  • 12-4 pm: Acuity Training Event (Includes Lunch)
    • Title: Bright Minds, Responsible Lighting: An Immersive Experience with Acuity Brands (Please see below)

11:40 AM – 4:00 PM

Emerging Professionals Day

Field Trip

In this three-hour event, you will tour Acuity Brands Des Plaines lighting manufacturing and distribution facility to learn how lighting fixtures are brought to market, including industry standard photometric testing,  manufacturing and distribution.  Vignettes and instructor-led demonstrations will reinforce use cases for a variety of lighting techniques, luminaire types and common terminology focusing on sustainable design practices.

 

  • Identify various luminaire types and their place in interior and exterior building applications.
  • Define and discuss common terminology as it relates to luminaires and their use.
  • Recall the path to market of luminaires and other lighting equipment from concept to end-of-life disposal.
  • Recognize the key elements of sustainability & their impacts including Embodied & Operational Carbon, Materials Responsibility & Workplace Social Responsibility as they pertain to creating, manufacturing, specifying, delivering and installing luminaires.

 

Credit AIA 3 LU | HSW Credits / FBPEILT 3 PDH Credits

8:00 AM – 3:00 PM

Leadership Forum

The IES Leadership Forum is the year’s most vital event for Section Leaders. This day-long program will give you the tools and information necessary to successfully lead your section and ensure that your section thrives! This year’s Leadership Forum will include roundtable discussions, membership growth best practices, and a DEIR Q&A, among other valuable lessons. If you are involved in Section Leadership at any level, please make sure to select Leadership Forum when registering for the Annual Conference.

11:00 AM – 3:00 PM

Past Presidents Lunch

5:00 PM – 6:00 PM

Illumination Awards Reception

6:00 PM – 8:00 PM

2023 Illumination Awards Gala

Celebrate the best in lighting and the 50th anniversary of the IES Illumination Awards!

8:00 PM – 10:00 PM

Illumination Awards After Party

With thanks to Title Sponsor; Acuity Brands

7:00 AM – 8:00 AM

Breakfast

8:00 AM – 8:30 AM

Morning General Session

8:30 AM – 9:30 AM

Speaker: Mark Lien, IES Industry Relations

1 CEU

9:30 AM – 6:30 PM

Tabletop Exhibits Open 

10:00 AM – 11:00 AM

Plenary Session

Speakers: Dane Sanders, Nick Mesler

1 CEU

Clanton and Associates worked with Salt Lake City from 2018 to 2020 to develop the Salt Lake City Lighting Master Plan, a significant shift in how Salt Lake City utilizes streetlights while balancing multiple values, including safety, character, equity and responsibility to public health and the environment. This came from the understanding that artificial light at night has impacts on each of these values, and a commitment to do better.

This presentation will discuss how the public engagement process and GIS data sources were utilized to develop the guideposts and comprehensive strategies of the Salt Lake City Street Lighting Master Plan. As this Street Lighting Master Plan is implemented over time, the street and pedestrian lighting will transition to utilizing dark sky strategies by reducing upward light, applying warmer color temperatures based on adjacent land uses, adaptive dimming strategies, and controlling light trespass.

11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Plenary Session

Speakers: Shirley Coyle

1 CEU

As awareness increases in multiple areas, the lighting community is thinking differently about outdoor lighting practice. Learn how changes in thinking may translate into practical changes in our outdoor lighting standards – as we incorporate learnings on Light & Human Health, Ecological Impact on Flora & Fauna, Light & Justice, and Dark Sky.

12:00 PM – 1:15 PM

Lunch & Tabletop Exhibits

1:15 PM – 2:15 PM

Breakout Sessions

Speaker: Karen Murphy

1 CEU

This session requires active participation. This session will review how to develop a business plan for lighting services. Will step through a progression of questions that will help attendees review and update their business plans. Business plan items that apply to independent lighting businesses as well as lighting departments within larger organizations will be discussed. We will explore goals and how to achieve them through well-crafted business plans. We will learn from each other and identify how to create and modify plans to form sustainable businesses.

Speaker: Ken Walczak

1 CEU

The Overview Effect has been described as a cognitive shift experienced by astronauts viewing the Earth from space. It can inspire “an overwhelming and increased sense of connection to other people and the Earth as a whole”. What could we learn if we had an Overview Effect for outdoor light at night?

Using an innovative imaging system flown on stratospheric high-altitude balloons – researchers, students and volunteers at the Adler Planetarium have mapped our world at night to reveal a new perspective on how we use outdoor lighting. We will show results from data collected over Indianapolis and how these nighttime maps can help inform responsible outdoor lighting practices. Our data reveals the primary sources of excessive upward light at night, the disparities in light emission and reveals strategies to best mitigate light pollution and lighting design for a better future for people and the Earth as a whole.

Papers/Technical Presentations

Presenter: Nina Sharp

In this study, we investigated the effect of a dynamic lighting intervention on sleep quality, depression, and agitation in older adults with dementia living in long-term care facilities. The study was conducted as a within-subject study design over 7 days of conventional lighting (Baseline) followed by 21 days of room lighting (Placebo) and then 21 days of dynamic lighting (Treatment). Findings suggested that lighting in memory care facilities plays a crucial role in enhancing the quality of life and sleep for older adults with dementia.

Presenter: Nina Sharp

In this study, we investigated the effects of applying a biodynamic lighting intervention in home offices on sleep quality, cognitive performance, and alertness in remote workers. Participants were involved in a five-week experiment. Each participant underwent a home screening visit and then had a one-week period of conventional lighting exposure to establish a baseline. Following this, they received two weeks of either biodynamic lighting or placebo lighting during the workday. In both interventions, participants received a similar dosage of circadian lighting throughout the working hours which was in accordance with the WELL Standard V2 guidelines for circadian lighting (275lux); however, the “time factor” was disregarded in the placebo condition. The results of this study offer compelling evidence that lighting is a crucial aspect of home-based work environments that has a significant impact on remote workers’ cognitive performance which has a direct bearing on the health and productivity of employees.

Presenter: Naomi Miller

The phantom array effect visibility has been investigated for 10 years or more, but no dataset has been complete enough for developing a visibility measure until now. Following the psychophysical procedure of other TLM metrics such as Mp and SVM, this paper presents its development and possible target values.

Presenter: Naomi Miller

Light sources located ≥60° vertically above the line of sight have conventionally been excluded from glare calculations. But then why do we wear baseball caps in bright overhead sunshine? The PNNL laboratory has conducted a human factors experiment to explore the response to glare sources at different positions to explore this issue, as well as looking at how two different SPDs affect the glare response. This talk will address some of the preliminary results.

2:15 PM – 3:15 PM

Breakout Sessions

Speakers: Shoshanna Segal, Carol C. Jones

1 CEU

With so many different types of systems and requirements, how do you get what you really want from lighting controls? Designers and architects need to consider the visual environment they are creating as well as the operational characteristics of the systems being installed. Design teams now often find themselves faced with questions of how to create a level of interoperability and digital integration with adjacent building systems that was not so commonplace in the recent past. Fortunately, the tools exist to articulate both the designer’s intent and the specific steps required to achieve that intent. By examining the development process behind the Control Intent Narrative and the Sequence of Operations, this seminar will provide guidance for assembling these documents and specific examples of language that is both clear and contractually enforceable.

Presenter: Nick Mesler

1 CEU

This presentation will cover regional street lighting design at scale and the considerations required beyond the standards. Through real project examples, attendees will gain insights into how regional illumination photometrics can identify existing lighting shortfalls, leading to improved decision-making and recommendations. The session will cover the integration of streetlighting considerations into comprehensive planning, addressing competing needs, promoting equity, and fostering collaboration with stakeholders.

Papers/Technical Presentations

Presenter: Jason Tuenge

This technical presentation will share findings from the first round of germicidal ultraviolet (GUV) product testing through the US Department of Energy’s CALiPER program. Electrical, radiometric, and photobiological safety testing was performed for three types of LED and low-pressure mercury (LPM) products: portable towers, whole-room luminaires for vacant spaces, and whole-room luminaires for occupied spaces.

Presenter: Rugved Kore

This session will give you insights on evaluation of the suitability of a mini-spectrometer and a RGB sensor as a wearable device. Various lighting conditions were measured using these two devices, and the data were compared with a calibrated spectroradiometer to analyze their accuracy.

Presenter: Jesús Obando

Light can be used as a means to create atmospheres in spaces that can influence mood, emotion, behavior, spatial impression and preference. In addition, it can impact the human biological clock by regulating multiple body functions such as sleep patterns, cognitive performance, mood, well-being, and hormone release and production. From this complex situation described above, about the effects of light on people, the interest of the present research work arises. The objective of this research is to determine the preferences of users of different age groups in relation to the various technological alternatives in indoor residential lighting.

Presenter: Mahya Fani

The study aims to investigate the extent to which interior features, including seating layouts and wall color and reflection, can affect the non-visual effects of daylight to increase daylight-driven circadian stimulus within a design-studio learning environment. The results suggest that the circadian potential of the space is positively correlated with the melanopic reflectance of the wall materials and the collaborative desk arrangement. These findings provide valuable insights for designers who wish to enhance daylight-driven circadian stimulus in flexible and collaborative learning environments, such as design-studio classrooms, while preserving the space’s geometrical characteristics.

3:30 PM – 4:30 PM

Breakout Sessions

Speaker: Robert Soler

1 CEU

The lighting industry has become more comfortable with the idea that light can impact our physiology beyond vision. The industry has battled internally over which metric to use, what criteria to meet and how long to meet said criteria. As we’re finally starting to find conclusion to these debates, one point of clarity remains. Circadian lighting and wellness lighting are not the same thing, nor should they be applied in the same way.

Through a combination of peer reviewed literature and translational overview, this talk will cover what circadian lighting is and what outcomes we can expect from circadian lighting. This talk will also cover what wellness lighting is and what we can expect from wellness lighting. It will cover how we should be thinking about applying each one in a variety of different settings including home, office, healthcare facilities and more.

Speakers: Brittany Lynch, Lisa Reed

1 CEU

Before the pandemic, retaining women talent in the lighting industry was strained. Women enter the workforce in the same capacity as their male counterparts. Yet if you look at company leadership, women are under-represented. At IALD in 2018, the question was posed: Why do women leave lighting design? The presentation revealed that mothers left lighting design due to their high demanding career colliding with their seemingly insurmountable parenting responsibilities.

Fast forward to September 2020, the whole country took note when over 850,000 women dropped out of the workforce. It became clear in the midst of the pandemic that schools were moving to online learning. In a moment of intense pressure, mothers stepped away from their salaries, careers, stability to teach America’s future generations. While mothers and caretakers have returned to the workforce, it still does not match pre-pandemic levels.

It’s time to take a step back and evaluate how companies are supporting our nation’s caregivers to retain valuable design talent. Four years later, we will follow up with the question: How do you retain working parents?

Papers/Technical Presentations

Presenter: Paolo Creati

Presentation description coming soon

Presenters: Lydia Simpson

Building on the 2016 study “Migraine photophobia originating in cone-driven retinal pathways.” and the 2000 study “The wavelength of light causing photophobia in migraine and tension-type headache between attacks.”, Shining a Light on Migraines looks at how different spectral distributions of green light affected the discomfort threshold of participants with and without migraines. The selected colors were based on the idea that green light is the least bothersome color of light for migraine-related photophobia while blue and red wavelengths of light are the most bothersome. While prior studies looked at narrow spectral distributions of primary colors, this study explores the spectrum between blue and red to see at what point green switches from therapeutic to bothersome.

Presenter: Michael Myer

In 2012, Williams et al, published a meta-analysis of lighting controls in commercial buildings. The underlying research that formed the meta-analysis primarily involved conventional lighting sources (non-light-emitting diode [LED]). The meta-analysis found “24% for occupancy sensors; 28% for daylighting; 31% for personal tuning; 36% for institutional tuning; and 38% for multiple approaches. ” Beyond the meta-analysis not including LED-based research, this research primarily involved zone-based lighting controls and not networked / luminaire level lighting controls (LLLC). Neither LEDs nor networked controls were prevalent prior to 2012.
In contrast, DesignLights Consortium (DLC) published in 2017 a study focused on savings from networked lighting controls (NLC) . This analysis involved 114 projects that included LEDs and NLC (some not all, LLLC systems). This DLC analysis found an average savings of 47% for NLC. DLC included a comparison of average savings from the NLC analysis with other studies. DLC specifically cited the 38% from Williams et al 2012 and the 47% value DLC found.
Neither of those analyses reported disaggregated savings withing the space for the different control schemes. This paper presents disaggregated energy savings across the space. This paper will provide an estimate of daylight savings from different distances from the vertical fenestration. This paper will demonstrate occupancy sensor savings based on sensor size.

Presenter: David Bratt, John Grepe

The need for connected emergency lighting stems primarily from the time, labor, and cost savings of completely automating the testing and reporting process to ensure the emergency lighting system remains fully operational and ready to perform when it is needed. The time and cost required to perform the testing and reporting becomes exorbitant even for moderately sized facilities. Using the technology now available to connect the emergency lighting system so the testing can be completed automatically at a time when it is convenient for a particular facility, can dramatically reduce the time and money needed to keep the system in tip-top condition. This presentation is designed to explain this in more detail and describe the various methods to achieve a connected emergency lighting system so the attendee can make a more informed decision on how to apply what is currently available today. One possible method will be explored in more depth. Again, the end result is to ensure the safety of occupants in a facility by having a fully operational emergency lighting system in place AND to save the time and money involved in keeping it that way.

4:30 PM – 6:00 PM

Progress Report 

The mission of the Progress Report is to keep in touch with developments in the art and science of lighting throughout the world and prepare a yearly report of achievements for the Society. Acceptance is based on an impartial judging process used by the committee to evaluate each submission on its uniqueness, innovation and significance to the lighting industry.

6:00 PM – 7:00 PM

Tabletop exhibit reception

7:00 PM – 9:30 PM

Friday Night Lights Platinum Sponsored Event

Sponsored by Cooper Lighting Solutions

7:00 AM – 8:00 AM

Breakfast

7:00 AM – 8:00 AM

Fellows Breakfast

7:00 AM – 1:30 PM

Tabletop Exhibits Open

8:00 AM – 9:00 AM

Morning General Session

9:00 AM – 10:00 AM

Plenary Session

Speaker: Kimberly Mercier

1 CEU

As creators of electric light, we elect to ignore our historic condition of living in nature’s light and, in so doing, we impact our health and wellbeing. If it were true, however, that we were impacting our physiological wellbeing, it would be obvious and there would be standards, and recommendations, and best practices…right?

In this presentation, the speaker will explore the evolving nature of lighting research related to light and health. She will share thought leader opinions about the race to create standards, the market conditions that are driving the light and human health environment, design considerations and challenges given the recommendations available, and suggestions for incorporating human health considerations in the lighting projects you are currently designing and building.

New discoveries in light and human health will change how the design community thinks about lighting design, implementation, control, lighting product manufacturing and availability, and our decisions about the lighting energy we spend. Let’s affect change with light!

controlling light trespass.

10:15 AM – 11:15 AM

Plenary Session

Speakers: Naomi Miller, Lia Irvin

1 CEU

Temporal Light Modulation (TLM) is an increasing phenomenon in indoor, outdoor, and vehicular applications, due to the widespread adoption of LED sources. Less than half of LED lighting systems produce problematic TLM, but it is common in small-profile linear luminaires, decorative fixtures, residential luminaires, screw base LED retrofit lamps, holiday light strings, vehicular tail lights, daytime running lights, dashboard displays, and even headlights. Unfortunately, there has been a delayed recognition that certain TLM waveform characteristics and viewing conditions can result in distraction and disorientation, cognitive effects, and serious health consequences in some populations. The neurological impacts may occur with or without conscious visibility of the TLM.

Research into responses to TLM is underway, but guidance is needed now, since anecdotal evidence suggests a link to migraines, nausea and disorientation, and even more serious health consequences. Until there is more evidence, we need provisional guidelines to raise awareness among dimmer, driver, and luminaire manufacturers.

11:15 AM – 12:15 PM

Plenary Session

Speaker: Ruth Taylor

1 CEU

The problem with lighting controls is people. You can run an entire conference about what people don’t know: how to use controls, how to repair controls that don’t work, how to configure networked systems, how to describe the systems they want or produce, and more. But what is being done?

Education, at least that is the typical answer. If we want to change the “how to”, the behaviors of market participants, maybe it’s time for some new tools to enhance the training of key under-represented sectors of the market.

This presentation outlines how the Department of Energy is developing new training priorities and methods in order to improve the effectiveness of lighting controls. For the last five years, DOE’s Next Generation Lighting Systems project has used observational research to characterize the problems at the various points where people interact with lighting controls. Ruth Taylor will describe the several research-based techniques that her team is developing with the goal of changing behaviors in the market.

12:15 PM – 1:30 PM

Lunch & Tabletop Exhibits

1:30 PM – 2:30 PM

Breakout Sessions

Speaker: Lyn Gomes, Michael Poplawski

1 CEU

A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away, DG-29, the standard for commissioning of lighting, was created. Time has passed, the industry has matured, and technology has advanced to the point that this standard required a major update both in content and name. When released later this year, it will become ANSI/IES LP-8, the Standard for Commissioning for Lighting and Lighting Control Systems. This document is a resource not only for commissioning providers, but also for the commissioning team (e.g., owners, architects, designers, engineers, contractors, distributors).

Master Yoda didn’t become a Jedi overnight – it was a process of mind and body training. Similarly, Commissioning is a systematic process (a series of discreet activities) that seeks to enhance delivery of a project. It focuses on verifying and documenting that all the commissioned systems and assemblies are planned, designed, installed, tested, operated, and maintained to meet the Owner’s Project Requirements (OPR). Commissioning starts in the predesign phase, continues into occupancy, and throughout the building’s lifetime. COMMISSIONING IS NOT STARTUP.

The update will improve on the original and serve as a practical, boots-on-the-ground resource for commissioning of lighting and lighting control systems that can be read and utilized in standalone sections. It will cover commissioning for large and small projects. Improvements include best practices, updates to outdated information, and align with ASHRAE Guideline 0 and the Building Commissioning Association’s Best Practices. (Commissioning providers will recognize these documents as the equivalent of the Jedi Path for Jedi Initiates.) It defines responsibilities for key members of the commissioning team and describes scope and sets minimum performance criteria for commissioning providers. Entirely new sections were created, including commissioning for existing buildings (aka retrocommissioning). Sample resources were added, including functional tests, design review checklists, and OPR and BOD examples and questionnaires.

As technology advances, so must the practice of commissioning. Our committee recognized this need and created content to explore future of the commissioning process. This presentation will be given by committee members (including a Jedi Commissioning Master) and serve as a pre-release preview of the standard. Come to this presentation to glean insights into best practices and weigh in on the future for true commissioning.

Speaker: Paige Donnell

1 CEU

While the concept of employee wellness has always been an important discussion topic, physical and nutritional health are more often prioritized while social, intellectual, and emotional health are not as actively analyzed and addressed. A key tool for addressing these often-overlooked wellness factors is mentorship: a holistic investment in our internal teaming, fulfillment, collaboration, productivity, project success, leadership development, and collective office-wide wellbeing. Throughout this talk, we will reveal a working model of mentorship and emphasize the role it plays in recruitment, staff engagement, leadership development, and retainment along with easy-to-integrate actions to enhance alignment, team dynamics, and goals.

Papers/Technical Presentations

Presenter: Mary Guzowski

This paper explores daylighting relationships between six bio-inspired design frameworks for nature-based strategies in architecture, including: biophilic, bioregional, bioclimatic, biomimetic, biomorphic, and biomaterial perspectives. How are these frameworks related, distinct, and/or integrated? The six bio-inspired frameworks discussed in this paper provide related but varied perspectives on nature and biology-inspired daylighting design. Integrating daylighting with one or more of these bio-inspired approaches is a strategic method to promote passive and low-energy strategies toward net-positive energy and sustainable design goals while simultaneously leveraging health benefits for humans, other species, and the planet.

Presenter: Abdulrahman Aljuhani, Richard Mistrick

Daylight Glare Probability (DGP) is impacted by both the vertical illuminance at an observer and characteristics of the glare source. This paper illustrates how different shade properties, as well as a view of the sun through the shades, impacts the predicted level of DGP.

Presenter: Tony Esposito

Using a simulation based on a real, five-channel tunable LED lighting system, we show that Correlated Color Temperature (CCT) is not a reasonable predictor of the biological potency of light, whether characterized with CIE melanopic Equivalent Daylight Illuminance (mel-EDI), Equivalent Melanopic Lux (EML) (a scalar multiple of mel-EDI), or Circadian Stimulus (CS). At a photopic corneal illuminance of 300 lx and Rf ≥ 70, spectra can vary in CS from 17 to 41% across CCTs from 2500 to 6000 K, and up to 23% at a single CCT, due to the choice of spectrum alone. The CS range is largest, and notably discontinuous, at a CCT of 3500 K, the location of the inflection point of the CS model. At a photopic corneal illuminance of 300 lx and Rf ≥ 70, mel-EDI can vary from 123 to 354 lx across CCTs from 2500 to 6000 K and can vary by up to 123 lx at a fixed CCT (e.g., 196 to 319 lx at 5000 K). The range of achievable mel-EDI increases as CCT increases and, on average, decreases as color fidelity, characterized with IES TM-30 Rf, increases. These data demonstrate that there is no easy mathematical conversion between CS and mel-EDI when a spectrally diverse spectra set of spectral power distributions is considered.

Presenters: Nayoun Ryu, Craig Bernecker

In a twenty block walk from 14th street to 34th street in New York, there are twenty sidewalk sheds covering a portion of each block. That means pedestrians spend almost half of their journey under a sidewalk shed. The common perception of a sidewalk shed is that it is a temporary construction, but in practice, many sidewalk sheds have been in place for over a year, with lighting conditions under the sheds an important consideration for pedestrians on a daily basis. Sidewalk sheds are a common sight in New York City, providing protection for pedestrians and property during construction. With over 9,000 active sheds and more than 2 million total linear feet, they have become a signature feature of the city’s urban landscape, particularly in Manhattan. However, while sidewalk sheds serve an important physical safety function, they also come with certain challenges, such as issues with lighting that can also impact safety.

2:30 PM – 3:30 PM

Breakout Sessions

Speakers: Chris Sorensen

1 CEU

What is the definition of a sustainable luminaire? A broad view of the environmental impact of lighting encompasses so much more than energy consumed. A deeper look at how luminaires are designed, manufactured, and used exposes a plethora of opportunities to reduce their impact. The future of product development in the lighting industry will be driven by sustainability.

Speakers: Harold Jepsen, Nancy Clanton, Matt Hartley, Jim Gaines

1 CEU

This panel discussion takes a proactive look at responsibly addressing lighting glare with the UGR metric. Using an application-based approach, we’ll cover key UGR principles, as well as its pitfalls, to effectively design for human health, wellness and comfort.

Papers/Technical Presentations

Presenter: Wangyang Song

Photometric measures based on CIE 2-degree standard observer have been utilized to predict scene brightness with mixed results. This study presents a method to evaluate corneal illuminance as an indicator to predict scene brightness.

Presenter: Yuwei Wang

Color contrast influences visual attention, recognition, comprehension, and aesthetic preference. This presentation will report findings of a study investigating the effect of color contrast on the visual clarity of complex visual environments.

Presenters: Maria Nilsson Tengelin, Stefan Källberg

In this presentation we show a method to investigate insect response to different luminance levels to find a threshold level for positive phototaxis. The set-up comprises a box with wide-angle cameras, near infrared LEDs and a luminance source with variable output. The activity level and pattern of movement at different light levels are demonstrated for Greater Wax Moth (Galleria Mellonella).

Presenters: Maria Nilsson Tengelin, Stefan Källberg

In this presentation, we will show a method with a sensitive light meter on a drone to measure light that is scattered up into the night sky. Measurements at different heights combined with images from the drone’s camera quickly provide a good overview of large areas and light sources contributing to light pollution. Specifically, we have investigated how light from a road lighting system is spread for different color temperatures and optics depending on the environment.

3:45 PM – 4:45 PM

Breakout Sessions

Speaker: Fanny Soulard

1 CEU

This presentation is an invitation to overcome and question our unconscious biases by investigating how we can play better with each one’s differences while designing a lighting project in a culturally diverse context.

The assessment of three study cases located in Vietnam will help to understand the cultural impact on a project elaboration and reveal how ICI – Inter-Cultural Intelligence- tools can generate significant benefits for individuals, teams, companies, and communities.

A role-playing game will close this session by inviting volunteers to express their opinion toward a given situation involving interculturality.

Speakers: Alp Durmus, Annika Jagerbrand, Maria Nilsson Tengelin

1 CEU

Light at night (LAN) enables us to enjoy outdoors at night, cultivates economic growth, and increases the perception of safety. Unfortunately, LAN has been connected to adverse health outcomes, such as circadian disruption, mood effects, and increased breast cancer incidence risk in humans. While the negative impacts of LAN at night, often referred to as light pollution, has gained popularity, the studies that lead to this body of knowledge were seldom under scrutiny. This talk will focus on not just what we know about light pollution and its circadian impacts on humans, but also how do we know what we know, specifically critically analyzing the methods and limitations of the light pollution studies.

Responsibly illuminating outdoor environments at night requires a better understanding of the impacts and the reasons for the documented impacts. Studies investigating health outcomes of LAN utilize a variety of methods sometimes resulting in conflicting outcomes. We conducted a systematic review focusing on the experimental methods and health outcomes of LAN studies conducted in lab, in-situ, and longitudinal studies. While most studies found a negative impact of LAN on human health, lighting conditions were not adequately reported or controlled in many cases. We will discuss best practices for future work investigating LAN effects on human health outcomes and emphasize the need for a multidisciplinary approach to improve the scientific quality of research studies. We will also provide recommendations for outdoor lighting practice to reduce negative impacts on human health.

Papers/Technical Presentations

Presenter: Mahya Fani

This study aims to assess the extent to which geometrical and optical properties of partitions, including their material, height and layout, affect the circadian potential of an open-plan office space. Results indicate that, generally, the circadian potential of the office space rises with the increase of the melanopic reflectance of the partition material and the decrease of partition height. With partitions higher than the eye level, arranging them in a parallel position to the window would result in higher EML levels, whereas with the lower partition heights, the perpendicular arrangement of partitions to the window would be a more suitable choice regarding the circadian lighting conditions in most of the investigated cases.

Presenter: Sarah Safranek, Corey Strachan

Relatively new metrics for characterizing the impact of light on non-visual physiological responses in humans has necessitated the development of spectral simulation tools that estimate the quantity and spectrum of light in the built environment. These spectral simulation tools increase the number of bands used to represent the color of materials and light sources to calculate metrics like equivalent melanopic lux (EML), which has a different spectral sensitivity than illuminance. One such tool, ALFA, is a Radiance-based commercial software that allows for spectral simulations using 81 bands, ideal for representing the spectral power distribution (SPD) of LED light sources. This presentation will 1) provide an overview of the spectral simulation workflow, including the current availability of spectral data; and 2) discuss the results of a analysis aimed identifying potential sources of error that may result from reasonable assumptions made throughout the design process.

Presenter: Michael Myer

The Zonal Cavity Method (also known as “Lumen Method”) has primarily been used to determine the average illuminance for interior applications. There are few calculation methods for calculating the average illuminance for exterior applications. A calculation has existed for calculating roadway illuminance, but a method for calculating average illuminance for non-roadway calculations currently has not been published.

Presenter: Michael Myer

Richman et al published An Empirical Data Based Method for Development of Lighting Energy Standards first as part of the 1998 IES Annual and then later in 1999 in the Journal of the IES. Since this publication, this method has been the primary method for establishing energy code lighting power densities for ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1 until the 2019 version.

4:45 PM – 5:45 PM

Keynote Speaker: Eric Corey Freed, RA, LFA, LEED Fellow, EcoDistricts AP
Principal, Sustainability Director
CannonDesign

1 CEU

Imagine a building that can boost immune response, lower blood pressure, or speed collaboration efforts. By tapping into biology, we can trigger these specific outcomes through the Architecture. In this talk, we’ll explore how to design student and health facilities that boost your biological responses.

We’ll explore a new approach to achieving high performance educational facilities using a symbiotic mindset to design in ways that triggers your biology to improve your health and outcomes. We’ll explore the six categories of symbiosis: Systems, Senses, Signals, Cycles, Biomes, and Genomes, to uncover new approaches to boost student test scores, lower stress levels, or speed comprehension.

As we move from the Digital Age to the Biological Age, the line between the natural and the manmade will start to disappear. In this talk, we’ll explore how to embrace biology as the ultimate technology to develop a new approach to sustainable design that affect the people who live, work and play in our buildings.

Imagine if we designed our buildings to work WITH our biology? In this session, we’ll explore this new paradigm for sustainability that combines biophilia, with evidence-based design, with wellness to create a new approach to designing healthy buildings. We’ll explore how we can design a building that triggers specific physiological responses in students and staff using physiological systems, human senses, circadian rhythm, neurotransmitters, and microbiomes to transform how we provide care and learning. We’ll look at how to deploy next generation materials that are “build with biology” to introduce a radical approach to wellness.

Eric gets into “good trouble” a lot these days. That’s because he’s not afraid to speak up against traditional ways of designing and building. The built environment is one of the largest contributors of carbon dioxide emissions in the world. He’s fixated on changing that.

Eric believes in moving toward a future where regenerative and restorative buildings become the standard. Whether facilitating client workshops about carbon-smart design or rallying crowds of thousands around the need for a circular economy, his message is the same: we have the tools needed to slow and even reverse the impacts of climate change—but we must act now.

 

About Eric:
Eric Corey Freed is an award-winning architect, author, and global speaker. As Principal and Director of Sustainability for CannonDesign, he leads the healthcare, education, and commercial teams toward low-carbon, healthy, regenerative buildings for over 30 million square feet a year. For two decades, he was Founding Principal of organicARCHITECT, a visionary design leader in biophilic and regenerative design. 

His past roles include Vice President of the International Living Future Institute and Chief Community Officer of EcoDistricts, both nonprofits pushing innovative new paradigms for deep green buildings and communities. He serves on the board of Design Museum Everywhere, whose mission is to “bring the transformative power of design to all.”

Eric is the author of 12 books, including “Green Building & Remodeling for Dummies” and “Circular Economy for Dummies.” In 2012, he was named one of the 25 “Best Green Architecture Firms” in the US, and one of the “Top 10 Most Influential Green Architects.” In 2017, he was named one of Build’s American Architecture Top 25. He holds a prestigious LEED Fellow award from the US Green Building Council.

Registration Type Early Bird
(through June 26)
Regular
(Jun 27-Aug 18)
Full Registration with Illumination Awards Gala (IES Members) $899 USD $999 USD
Full Registration with Illumination Awards Gala (Non-Member) $1,169 USD $1,269 USD
Full Registration (IES Member) $699 USD $799 USD
Full Registration (Non-Member) $969 USD $1,069 USD
Full Registration with Illumination Awards Gala (Emerging Professional) $629 USD $699 USD
Full Registration with Illumination Awards Gala (Student) $429 USD $499 USD
Full Registration without IA Gala (Emerging Professional) $429 USD $499 USD
Full Registration with Illumination Awards Gala (Retired/Emeritus Member) $629 USD $699 USD
Full Registration without IA Gala (Retired/Emeritus Member) $429 USD $499 USD

SPONSORSHIP PACKAGES  & TABLETOP BOOKINGS NOW OPEN

Yes, that’s right! You can now book your sponsorship package and/or tabletop exhibit for IES24!

Tabletop Exhibit Policies:

Tabletop Sessions

FORMAT

Cloth covered tables (6’ X 30”) upon which equipment and literature are displayed. IES policy strictly limits the amount of material brought to the tabletop exhibit to fit on a six-foot table: No stand-alone backdrops, no floor displays or oversized products will be permitted.

SCHEDULE

Friday, August 19, 2022
Exhibit Reception at Hilton New Orleans Riverside: 6:30pm-8:00pm

IES WILL PROVIDE

One six-foot cloth covered table (6’ x 30”) upon which equipment and literature are displayed. Electrical power outlet 500 watts (5 amp) if needed for an additional fee. Company sign and exhibitor badge credentials for one person to work at your table.

CANCELLATION

An administrative fee of 50% of the contract fee will be charged for any cancellation occurring within 30 days of the conference start date of July 19, 2022.

INSTRUCTIONS

Will be sent upon receipt of this agreement from the IES office and will include confirmation of payment, set-up and break-down times, conference information and exhibitor shipping instructions. By registering you agree to follow IES Policy that strictly limits the amount of material brought to the tabletop exhibit to fit on a six-foot table. No stand-alone backdrops, no floor displays or oversized products will be permitted.

FEE

IES Member Pricing
$2,200 for each table

Non-Member Pricing
$2,750 for each table

Space is limited. Registration closes for tabletops on August 8, 2022.

Future Annual Conference Dates

2024

15 – 17 August, 2024
New York Marriott Marquis, 1535 Broadway, New York

AC24 Draft initial web ad 600x200